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Clearing of the tomb Bab el Gasus – Cache II – and transport of the coffins to the river in February 1891

Bab el-Gasus shabti owners

Amenhatpamecha – imn-HAt-pA-mSa – 4 types

Amenhotep – imn-Htp

Amenniutnakht – imn-niwt-nxt

Amenpermut – imn-pr-mwt

Ankhefenkhonsu – anxf-n-xnsw – 2 persons

Ankhefenmut – anxf-n-mwt

Ankhesenmut – anxs-n-mwt

Baakenbaak – bAk-n-bAk

Bakenmut (I) – bAk-n-mwt

Bakenmut (II) – bAk-(n)-mwt

Dikhonsuiry – di-xnsw-iry

Djedkhonsuiufankh – Dd-xnsw-iwf-anx – 2 persons

Djedmaatiusankh – Dd-mAat-iws-anx

Djedmutiusankh – Dd-mwt(-iws-anx)

Dyrepu- dy-rpw

Gautseshenu A – gAwt-sSnw – 2 types

Gautseshenu B – gAwt-sSnw

Henuttawy – Hnwt-tAwy – 2 types

Herytubekhet – Hryt-wbxt

Hor or Hori – Hr.i

Iset (Isis) – Ast

Isety – Ast.y

Isetemkhebit – Ast-m-Ax-bit – 2 persons

Khaas – xAas

Khonsuemheb – xnsw-m-Hb – 2 types

Khonsuenrenep – xnsw-n-rnp

Khonsumes – xnsw-ms

Makaekra – m-kAk-ra

Mehunedjem – mHw-nDm – 2 types

Menkheperra B – mn-xpr-ra B

Meretamen / Amenmeret – imn-mrt – 3 types

Nekhbu – nxbw

Nespaherentahat – ns-pA-Hr-n-tA-Hat

Nespakashuty – ns-pA-qA-Swty – 2 types

Nespaneferher – ns-pA-nfr-Hr

Nessuan – ns-sw-an

Nestanebettawy – ns-tA-nbt-tAwy

Nestaudjat(akhet)– ns-tA-wDAt-(Axt)

Nesyamen – nsy-imn

Nesyamenipet – nsy-imn-ipt

Nesykhonsu– nsy-xnsw

Nesymut – nsy-mwt

Nesypaheran – nsy-pA-Hr-an

Nesypawtytawy – nsy-pAw-ty-tAwy

Nesypernub – nsy-pr-nwb

Padiamon (I) – pA-di-imn

Padiamon (II) – pA-di-imn

Pakharu – pA-xArw

Panebenkemetnakht – pA-nb-n-kmt-nxt

Pasebakhaenniut – pA-sbA-xa-niwt

Payefadjer – pAyf-aDr

Saatkhonsu – sAt-xnsw (box)

Shedsuamen – Sd-sw-imn

Shedsuhor – Sd-sw-Hr

Tabaketenkhonsu – tA-bAkt-n-xnsw

Tadimut – tA-dit-mwt

Tahenetdjehuty – tA-Hnt-DHwty (= Tahenetnebkhemenu)

Tahenetnebkhemenu – tA-Hnt-nb-xmnw (= Tahenetdjehuty)

Tamer – tA-mr

Tashedkhonsu – tA-Sd-xnsw- 3 types

Tashepesethat – tA-Spst-Hat

Taudjatra – tA-wDAt-ra

Tentipet – Tnt-ipt

Tentosorkon – Tnt-sArknA

Tentshedkhonsu – Tnt-Sd-xnsw (=Tashedkhonsu)

Tenttawy – Tnt-tA-wy

Tjanefer – TA-nfr

Udjat – wDAt

Userhatmes – wsr-HAt-ms – 3 types

 

 

 

NB The name of the shabtis of which it is not certain whether they come from the Bab el Gasus tomb is shown in italics

NB With the spelling chosen for names and transliteration, I was unable to find a standard for the use of Tnt and tA and ns and nsy. For example, Nekhons or Nesykhonsu. This can lead to other names than the ones you like to use, therefore I have included several names for each shabti that might be similar to the ones you use and if all goes well Google should be able to find them as well.

 

 

Emptying the Bab el Gasus tomb.
A watercolor drawing by Marianne Brocklehurst who was one of the few travelers present. See Janes, The Amasis Collection for a detailed description pg. 261-270
Photo courtesy West Park Museum Macclesfield via IW

Transport of the coffins to the Nile
The second watercolor drawing by Marianne Brocklehurst. See Janes
Photo courtesy West Park Museum Macclesfield via IW

Photo by Daressy on February 5th, 1891 of the local workers who helped emptying the tomb and transport to the river. See Janes, The Amasis Collection pg. 269, for the authentication of known persons.
Photo: Facebook

Location of Bab el Gasus Cache II tomb entrance. Hidden in plain sight
Youtube: VB 2012

Shabtis of the Tomb of the Priests of Amun


This page shows all shabti series found in the Bab el Gasus tomb at Deir el-Bahri, also called Cache II, Second Deir el Bahari Cache and Gate of the Priests. Sections are per owner

While visiting Hatshepsut Temple, most visitors have no idea that they are passing one of Egypt’s most important archaeological sites. The tomb is just a few meters from the visitor centre, but officials have not posted a sign to indicate the site

It was January 1891 when Mohammed Abd el-Rassul, the same person who unveiled the Royal Cache DB320 ( Cache I ) with royal mummies, told Eugène Grébaut that he had found a new grave. After opening, they discovered another exceptional group funeral dated to 950 BC containing 153 coffins (101 double) and 153 mummies of the priests Amen, princesses and princes ( Cache II )

The Egyptologist George Daressy, assistant of Eugène Grébaut, the head of the Egyptian Antiquities Service, was responsible for clearing the tomb. Mr. Urbain Bouriant, director of the French archaeological mission, assisted Daressy

Daressy and Bouriant documented shabtis for 58 individuals. I found 70 persons with shabtis of which 7 are uncertain, of the latter the names are in italics in this study

Of the 70 people I recorded, 39 are male and 31 are female

Daressy reported to have discovered 110 shabti boxes. In my research I could trace only 52 shabti boxes (with or without inventory number) of which 22 are documented with photos or text. So most shabti boxes can’t be found. Not registered, anonymous, donated away, sold or disappeared

The coffins and other grave goods were removed from the graves in just 9 days from 5 to 13 February 1891. The tomb was quickly emptied due to safety concerns. Daressy slept in a tent next to the entrance to the shaft to guard the find

Most of the coffins were double (101) and consisted of an outer and inner coffin, 52 single ones were found, so 254 in all. The coffins were sent to Cairo and in 1893 several coffins, boxes and shabtis were selected as a gift from the Khedive of Egypt. Abbas II Helmy Bey, to 17 museums in several other countries. Today, at least 30 museums around the world display the famous so-called “yellow” coffins

The site was called Bab el Gasus, also translated as “Door of the Priests”

In the tomb Daressy made a list of the owners of the coffins found. Bouriant and Grébaut did the same outside the tomb and listed the owners of the coffins, shabtis, Osiris statuettes (77) and (shabti) boxes with his own numbering. When the coffins arrived at the museum in Giza, they were again assigned a number, the so-called Journal d’Entrée number (JE). In 1907 the combined lists were published in Cercueils des Prètres d’Amon

Unfortunately, mistakes have been made and nowadays there are international initiatives (f.e. The Vatican Coffin Project) to find out where things went wrong, so that an unambiguous cataloguing can still take place

Prof. Niwinski dates the mass reburial to the reign of King Psusennes II c. 959-945 BC

Today the tomb is used by the Polish mission for the preservation of finds

This overview would not exist without the help, research and publications of

Prof. Andrzej Niwinski, specialist in religious and mythological iconography of the XXI – XXII dynasty, who fulfils an incredibly important task in his research on coffins, papyri and everything related to the Third Intermediate Period. His publications are of unparalleled quality and without his research this B&G shabti publication would be a lot less interesting. His enthusiasm and knowledge about the Third Intermediate Period inspire daily

Miguel Ángel Escobar Clarós, for unprecedented in-depth research into the discovery, the different names of the owners whose shabtis were found and the distribution of the shabtis to various museums and institutions. His enthusiasm and scientific approach have inspired me, many enthusiasts and scientists to learn more about the individual shabtis and their journey around the world to various museums and private collections

Niek de Haan, who, with his love for the Cache II shabtis, conducts research into individual groups of shabtis and publishes this in the Academia group and on his website shabticollections.com. In addition, he visited museums at every opportunity to photograph shabtis. He made these photos available to me and this has proven to be a valuable resource for this publication as finding images of some rare Cache II shabtis is not very easy

Glenn Janes, who, with his unparalleled knowledge of shabtis, has compiled numerous publications and reference works with beautiful photographs, finely detailed descriptions, and an unimaginable number of parallels and references of each shabti he describes. A treasure trove in your library for shabti references

Liliane Aubert who, with her 1998 publication, for the first time provided a fairly complete and well-founded overview of the BeG shabtis and laid the foundation for further research

Marianne Zarli who has researched the B&G shabtis in Florence and created an unbeatable publication with fantastic photos in the book The tomb of the priests of Amun

Relevant publications

Les sépultures des prêtres d’Ammon à Deir el-Bahari by M. Georges Daressy 1900
– overview of the location of the coffins in the tomb)

Cercueils des Prètres d’Amon, deuxième trouvaille de deir El-Bahari by M. Georges Daressy 1907
– composite overview of Daressy’s A and B lists

Les statuettes funéraires de la deuxième cachette à Deir El Bahari by Liliane Aubert 1998 – Bulte, J. – Yoyotte, J.
– first very complete description of the BeG shabtis, a standard work for the BeG shabtis

The tomb of the priests of Amun by Rogério Sousa (editor); Maria Cristina Guidotti, Marianne Zarli, e.o. 2019
– excellent publication with fantastic photos of the coffin sets and Bab el Gasus shabtis in Florence

Bab El-Gasus in Context: Rediscovering the Tomb of the priests of Amun, 2021
– 576-page edition with mainly black and white photos and a firm price includes a wide range of articles including an overview of the Bab el Gasus papyri by Giuseppina Lenzo, but unfortunately only a short article with a single photo of the shabtis in Berlin

The Shabti Box A Typological Study, OMRO 74, David Aston 1994
– extensive overview of shabti coffins with a classification by type and period

21st Dynasty coffins from Thebes: Chronological and typological studies, by Andrzej Niwinski 1988
– outstanding standard reference publication for coffins of Thebes from the Third Intermediate Period

Estatuetas funerárias Egípcias da XXI dinastia, by Luís Manuel de Araújo 2003
– extensive overview (more than 1100 pages) of shabtis from the Third Intermediate Period with beautiful photos showing both the front and the back of the shabtis

Burial Assemblages of Dynasty 21-25: Chronology – Typology – Developments by David Aston 2009
– very complete and standard reference of the burial assemblages of Dynasty 21-25

Studies on the illustrated Theban Funerary Papyri of the 11th and 10th Centuries B.C. by Prof. Andrzej Niwinski, 1989
– another amazing work from this author. In my overview I have taken the liberty of showing the notes from his publication to quickly get a complete overview of the papyri that can be attributed to a shabti

Contribution à l’étude de l’Amdouat: Les variantes tardives du Livre de l’Amdouat dans les papyrus du Musée du Caire by Sadek, Abdel-Aziz Fahmy 1985
– extensive reference publication of the Amdouat papyri in Cairo

Mythological papyri, by Alexandre Piankoff and Natacha Rambova, 1957
– this well written publication includes the complete photographic recording important mythological papyri (many from Bab el Gasus), and miscellaneous cosmological texts and symbolical representations. The series includes, where possible, the full translation of texts

Catalogue général des antiquités égyptiennes du Musée du Caire compiled by Michael Tilgner and Ingeborg Waanders, with major additions by Alain Dautant
– unlocks free access to searchable standard high quality reference works

Funerary Statuettes and Model Sarcophagi, Percy E. Newberry 1930, 1937, 1957
Fascicule 1, Le Caire, 1930, CG 46530-48273
Fascicule 2, Le Caire, 1937, CG 48274-48575
Fascicule 3, Le Caire, 1957, Indices and Planches
– standard reference for shabtis in the Cairo Museum

Bab el Gusus, Cache-tomb of the priests & priestesses of Amen
– excellent article about the tomb by Jadwiga Lipinska in KMT, Volume 4, Issue 4, Winter 1993-1994

Priests of the Amen Cache
– extensive description of the find with unique photos. Also two unique realistic sketches made by European tourists who stayed in Luxor at the time of the excavation. Can be found in Glenn Jane’s publication ‘The Amasis Collection’, 2020, p. 261-271

Shabtis: A Private View
– a stunning publication by Glenn Janes about shabtis of all periods. With full-size photos of shabtis, back and front view and useful references

Ägyptische Totenfiguren aus öffentlichen und privaten Sammlungen der Schweiz
– an important reference work by Schlögl and Brodbeck, showing the front and back (black/white) of the shabtis and recording in-depth research for each shabti

Shabtis
– this publication of Prof. Hans Schneider needs no further introduction. It offers an unparalleled detailed overview of an enormous amount of shabtis

Abbreviations and references

BD = Book of the Dead
BA = Amduat papyrus
MP = Magical papyrus

Cairo museum numbering system from highest to lowest rank
CG = Catalogue General of Egyptian Antiquities in the Cairo Museum (published objects)
JE = Journal of Entry number Cairo Museum (begun 19th century)
T =Temporary Register Cairo (begun in 1914)
SR or S.R. = Special Registers Cairo (begun in 1959-60)
nnnn.. = Exhibition numbers Cairo (at the objects in the cabinets)

OC: = Outer coffin (CG… top/lid – CG… bottom)
IC: = Inner coffin (CG… top/lid – CG… bottom)
MB: = Mummy board
based on Niwinski 21st Dynasty Coffins (after Brunton & Guēraud) pg.202-204 Table III

Note: In the coming years, a number of coffins are likely to be renumbered or relocated in response to the Vatican-initiated investigation of 21st dynasty coffins, see the Vatican Coffin Project

Typology shabti boxes (Aston, The Shabti Box A Typological Study)
Va = pictorial style with 3 lids (average dimensions 40-60 long, 30 cm wide)
Vb = inscriptional style with 3 lids
Vc = undecorated with 3 lids
VIa = pictorial style with 2 lids
VIb = inscriptional style with 2 lids
Vc = undecorated with 2 lids

Photo and publication credits
VB = Dik van Bommel (author), photos are free to use for non-commercial purposes
Images may be subject to copyright
NH = Niek de Haan www.shabticollections.com
GJ = Glenn Janes www.shabtis.com
Internet or other publications. If known I mention the source
For the sake of fast reference, I also added scans of the amazing works of Professor Andrzej Niwinski, Abdel-Aziz Fahmy Sadek, Percy E. Newberry and of course Georges Daressy 

Authors of reference material
Zarli = Marianne Zarli who did an awesome job cataloguing the Florence Cache II shabtis in the Tomb of the Priests of Amun
Aston = Burial Assemblages of Dynasty 21-25 and The Shabti Box A Typological Study
Aubert = Liliane Aubert, Les statuettes funéraires de la Deuxième Cachette à Deir el-Bahari
Niwinski = Studies on the illustrated Theban Funerary Papyri of the 11th and 10th Centuries B.C. and 21st Dynasty Coffins from Thebes
Daressy’s coffins, Bouriant’s shabti boxes list and Daressy’s/Bouriants’s shabti list = Cercueils des Prètres d’Amon, deuxième trouvaille de deir El-Bahari

“Examination of a Mummy – The Priestess of Ammon” Taudjatra (1891)
Oil on canvas, by Paul Dominique Philippoteaux.
From left to right:
Marquis De Reverseaux (minister of France)
Mr. Eugène Grébaut (head Antiquities Service)
Dr. Damiel Fouqet (physician)
Mr. Émile Brugsh (curator of the Bulaq Museum)
Mr. George Daressy (making notes)
Mr. H. Bazil (secretary of the museum)
Mr. J. Barois (general secretary public works)
Mr. Urbain Bouriant
(director of the French archaeological mission)

La Science Illustree – October 1891 pg. 353
Artwork from the eighth volume (second period of 1891) of the French popular science weekly ‘La Science Illustree’

Map of the location of the coffins in Bab el Gasus by Prof. Andrzej Niwinski
Photo: © 21st Dynasty coffins from Thebes: Chronological and typological studies, 1988

Map of the location of the shabti owners and shabti boxes in Bab el Gasus by Miguel Ángel Escobar Clarós

Combined (coffin) list, Daressy 1907 (composition of the lists made during the excavation)
Column 1 = A-list number noted by Daressy in the B&G tomb, used to identify the coffins
Column 2 = B-list number noted by Bouriant outside the tomb (he numbered various other items like Osiris statuettes and shabti boxes, so his numbers do not match the ones from the A-list)
Column 3 = Entry number(s) of the coffins in the Cairo Museum, JE 29nnn
Column 4 = Catalog number or Lot number distribution
Column 5 = Name and / or object description
Source: ‘Les cercueils des prêtes d’Ammon‘, 1907

Example combined (coffin) list

Shabti list, Daressy 1907
Because Daressy will have compiled the shabti-list (59 owners) from notes made by Bouriant during the excavation and their research in Cairo, I included the name Bouriant in the names of the images of the shabtis. With the images of the coffins, I have included the name of Daressy

Because it turned out that this list is not complete, I have included the proven and plausible owners in the overview and that brings the total number of different owners to possibly 70

Column 1 = Name on the shabtis noted by Daressy/Bouriant
Column 2 = A-list (coffin) number by Daressy
Column 3 = Material of which the shabti is made
Source: ‘Les cercueils des prêtes d’Ammon‘, 1907

Example shabti list (Bouriant/Daressy)

Cache II Bab el Gasus shabtis at the Museu da Sociedade de Geografia in Lisbon. Gift (lot 8) from the Egyptian Khedive Abbas Hilmi II in 1893. Photo: VB 2009

Catalogue Bab el-Gasus shabtis

Amenhatpamecha – imn-HAt-pA-mSa
4 types
Daressy A.124 (see papyri)
Also known as Amenemhatpamecha, Amenhatpamesha, Amenemhet, Imenhatpamecha, Amumemhatpamescha
Ranke I, pg. 28, 10, Ranke II, pg. 340, 28.10
The name means ‘Amen is at the front of his army’, ‘Amen is the commander/chief of the army‘, see the remarks at type 4

God’s father of Amen, God’s father of Mut
(a papyrus also indicates his devotion to the god Hemen as the Prophet of the Horus of Hefat and two other papyri mention the titles God’s father of Amen and Chief of Chariot Drivers (Chevereau, Doc. 19), Aubert pg.52)
There is also another title on BD S.R.VII.10230 that gives him the title Superior of the (gold) miners (communication with Glenn Janes and Huub Pragt)

Son of Ankhefenmut (Daressy A.16, no shabtis, not in this overview)

Associated with coffin(s) JE 29696, OC: CG-6001-6062

Funerary papyri
BD S.R.VII.10230, Cairo 67

Imenhatpamsha Book of the Dead

Book of the Dead for Amenhatpamecha
Length 245 cm, height 23 cm
See also Niwinski Studies on the illustrated Theban Funerary Papyri 1989 plate 26a, 26-28
Panorama view, VB 2021

BA S.R.VII.11495, Cairo 117

Amenhatpamecha, Contribution à l’étude de l’Amdouat, © Sadek 1985, C24 Planche 34-35, for description see page 180-182

No shabti boxes known
Burial c. 978 BC (Aston)

The link to the anonymous coffin A.124 seems based on the papyri found with a mummy attributed to this coffin

All 24 worker shabtis registered by Newberry CG 46714-46732 – CG 46759-46763 are between 12 cm and 12.5 cm. Although I am listing 4 different types here because I see obvious differences, Newberry registered them as one series

The 4 overseers measure 13.5 cm and are listed as CG 46764-46767. The overseer of type 3 measures 12 cm (1.5 cm shorter than the ones in the Cairo Museum)

The text (hieroglyphs) on the individual shabtis of type 1 alternates from left to right and vice versa

Amenhatpamecha – imn-HAt-pA-mSa
Type 1
Characteristic of this series are the slim version, the narrow arms with small hands. Often the title God’s Father of Amen is mentioned and there are usually no vertical lines to the left and right of the hieroglyphs

Worker Cairo Museum label 10320 12.5 cm, overseer Galerie Eberwein 2014, approx. 12.5 cm
Photo: worker VB Cairo 2015, overseer Galerie Eberwein 2014

Amenhatpamecha – imn-HAt-pA-mSa
Type 3

In this group the arms of the workers are crossed the other way over each other compared to types 1 and 2. Unfortunately the photo of the overseer is too unclear to determine whether it is the case there.

Worker in Milan, Civiche Raccolte Archeologische e Numismatiche, E. 0.9.40194 11.5 cm. I attributed the 12 cm overseer to this series  because of the length and resemblance of painting. The overseers in Newberry are longer and measure 13.5 cm
Photo: worker Il Cammino di Harwa pg. 126, overseer Millon, Drouot lot 153 27 June 2016

Here a beautiful light blue 12.1 cm worker from a British private collection. Special how in the same series the colour intensity can change between light and dark blue A feature we also see in the Royal Cache.
Photo: Glenn Janes

Amenhatpamecha – imn-HAt-pA-mSa
Type 2
Slightly firmer than type 1, arms and hands more robust than the narrow arms and small hands of the first type, the inscription without title is in a frame. Newberry made no registration for this type with vertical lines next to the hieroglyphs

Worker private collection UK, ex Michel Phillipe (see Aubert pg. 65, Planche I) 12.5 cm
Photo: Glenn Janes

Amenhatpamecha – imn-HAt-pA-mSa
Type 4

Contrary to the other series, the eyes and tools are neatly worked out in the faience. The painter only put a black dot on each eye, while the other series have a beautiful black eye outline. Another difference is a different spelling of the name as:
Amenhatyaemmesha – imn-HAt(y)-a-m-mSa

This name may be translated as Amen is the Chief of the Army, literally it says Amen is the Mayor in the Army. On the other types the name means Amen is the Commander of the Army (communication with Huub Pragt).

Fortunately, Miguel Ángel Escobar Clarós pointed me to Newberry’s registration CG 46761 of this name so that we can link the shabti to the BeG find. On CG 46760 the ‘a’ is present, but the ‘m’ is omitted. Maybe the scribe had an off day
Worker 12 cm, Bonhams, London, Antiquities, 26 Oct 2007, lot 329
Photo: Bonhams, London

Amenhotep – imn-Htp
Daressy A.39
Also known as Imenhotep, Imenipet, Amenhetep, Amunemhotep
Ranke I, pg. 30, 12, Ranke II, pg. 341
The name means ‘Amen is merciful’

God’s father of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, Scribe of the army recruits, Wab-priest of Mut in the temple of Amen

Son of a Aset (perhaps our Aset/Isis in this overview?)

Coffins JE (unknown) in The Smithsonian in Washington IC: Inv.no. A154959, MB: A364999 (register entry) and part of the coffin in London BM EA15658

Funerary papyri
BD S.R.IV.543 = JE 95646, Cairo 9, Type BD.II.1 Niwinski

Book of the Dead for Amenhotep
Length 142 cm, height 24 cm
Panorama view, VB 2021

BA S.R.IV.546 = JE 95648, Cairo 12

Amduat papyrus for Amenhotep
Length 137 cm, height 23 cm
See Mythological Papyri 1957, Piankoff and Rambova Plate 26, for description see page 189-191

Panorama view, VB 2021

One shabti box was noted by Bouriant B.45. The box may be in Turkey
The coffin can be dated to c. 1050-950 BC (Aston)

Newberry has registered no fewer than 19 overseers and 39 worker shabtis of Amenhotep in the Cairo Museum CG 46644-46691CG 46734-46738 and CG 46768-46772.

The worker shabtis vary in length and can measure between 8.8 cm and 10.5 cm. Several moulds may have been used. Here is an example of two shabtis from a Dutch collection. The one on the left is 98mm and the other one 88mm. Photo: Niek de Haan 2021

See also shabticollections SC/43 and for a nice overseer Les statuettes funéraires de la deuxième cachette à Deir El Bahari, pg. 54 and pg. 66 planche II, Liliane Aubert 1998
Photo: VB 2015

Amenhotep – imn-Htp
Worker Cairo labelled 10413 approx. 9.5 cm, overseer Cairo labelled 10420 approx. 9.5 cm
Photo: VB 2015

Shabti box of Amenhotep, noted by Bouriant in Daressy as B.45

This is probably the shabti box from Amenhotep, noted by Scheil in 1898 in Monuments égyptiens – notice sommaire – Musée Impérial Ottoman in Istanbul, Turkey pg. 14-15. Research by Miguel Ángel Escobar Clarós

Amenniutnakht – imn-niwt-nxt
Daressy A.81
Also known as Amennioutnakht
Ranke I, pg. 29, 12Ranke II, pg. 341, 29.12
The name means ‘Amen of the victorious city’

God’s father of Amen, Wab-priest, Wab-priest of the House of Anubis, Overseer of the Wab-priests, Overseer of the Secrets of Amen, Chamberlain of Amen, Mut and Khonsu, Chamberlain of the Lord of the two Lands, Overseer of the engravers in the domain of Amen

Coffins JE 29649 in Cairo IC: CG-6173-6174, MB: CG-6196, funerary papyri
BD S.R.VII.10224, Cairo 61

Book of the Dead for Amenniutnakht
Length 513 cm, height 23 cm
Panorama view, VB 2021

MP S.R.IV.946 = JE 95848 = CG 58025, Cairo H

One shabti box JE 29278 (type Va)

Newberry has registered 25 workers and 8 overseers under the name niwt-nxt CG 47951-47983, he left ‘Amen’ – ‘imn’ out

Pontificate Pinedjem II and Amenemope c. 1001-992 BC (Aston), the shabti box is dated to the period c. 990-984 BC (Aston, The shabti box, a typological study)

Amenniutnakht – imn-niwt-nxt
Worker CG 47955 approx. 6.7 cm in Cairo, overseer Dutch private collection 6.3 cm
Photo: worker VB 2015, overseer NH 2021
Here the worker with two other overseers of approx. 6.5 cm (overseer in the middle is probably labelled 10337) in the Cairo Museum, photo: VB 2015

Shabti box of Amenniutnakht type Va in Cairo, JE 29278

Amenpermut – imn-pr-mwt
Daressy A.93
Also known as Imenpermout, Imenpermut, Amenpermout
Ranke I, pg. 28, 4
His name means ‘Amen is in the house of Mut’

God’s father of Amen-Re, the king of the gods

Coffins JE 29706 (attributed to a person named Padiamun, usurped by Amenpermut, dated c. 1050-1040 BC) IC: CG-6152-6153, MB: CG-6160 in Cairo, maybe inside an Osiris figure JE 29317 a funerary papyrus (Aston)

Little is known about this mysterious shabti. The fragility and unsightly appearance may be the cause. It is plausible that Daressy and Bouriant saw this series and that the shabtis were present at the tomb. Newberry found 10 examples in the Cairo Museum and registered them under the name Mut without attribution to the Bab el Gasus Cache

Newberry registered 10 workers CG 48155-48159, CG 48170-48174

Amenpermut – imn-pr-mwt
Worker Petrie UC40026 10.2 cm
Photo: Petrie Museum

Ankhefenkhonsu – anxf-n-xnsw
Daressy A.108 (Daressy) and/or A.33 (Aubert), other namesakes A.3, A.63 and A.112
Also known as Ankhefenkhonsou, Ankhefenkhons, Anchefenchons
Ranke I, pg. 67, 9, Ranke II, pg. 347
His name means ‘He lives for Khonsu’

At least five individuals with this name seem to have been buried in Cache II. Two sets shabtis of Ankhefenkhonsu are known and Daressy attributed the first set to A.108.

Zarli mentions that Aubert has attributed those with the small eyes to A.33 and those with the large eyes to A.108. Unfortunately, on both types the eyes can be nicely painted, so the one with small eyes in Aubert pg. 57 is not exemplary for the rest. Nor are there any titles on the shabtis that we can use to solve the mystery. So, for now it is impossible to assign a series to a particular owner. This is confirmed by Aubert by showing them together in one overview on page 56

What we do know is that the shabtis of the first type (A.108 in this overview) were included in the lots that went to the museums in 1893 and that Newberry also found them in the Cairo museum. Little is known about the second set (A.33), apart from Aubert’s documentation (pg. 56-57). Since Liliane Aubert has recorded the second set, I assume that she has strong indications of its origin from B&G. The shabtis may have been resold (most likely by the Cairo Museum) on the open market

I do not follow the indication in Aubert (page 56, top), as I am convinced that the first series belongs to A.108, as they were the only series in the distribution to the museums

The second series (A.33 in this overview) differ from the first series by: large eyes, less slim and little more stocky, less neatly written with bold hieroglyphs (see the examples in Aubert, pg. 57), headband, thinner white underlay and the spell starts with Shedj

Newberry has registered 10 workers and 10 overseers in the Cairo Museum CG 47984-48003 of the first type, there is no indication that he found the second type.

Ankhefenkhonsu (I) – anxf-n-xnsw
A.108
(first series)
God’s father of Amen-Re, the kings of the gods, Beloved by the God, Overseer of the secrets , Overseer of the engravers in the domain of Amen 

Coffins JE 29663 in Cairo OC: CG-6208-6209, IC: CG-6210|6193, MB: CG-6194

Funerary papyri
BD S.R.IV.556 = JE 95658, Cairo 19

Book of the Dead for Ankhefenkhonsu
Length 159 cm, height 23 cm
Panorama view, VB 2021

BA S.R.IV.554 = JE 95656 (anonymous), Cairo 17
Attribution to this owner probably not correct, see papyrus for Herytubekhet

One shabti box Berlin BM 11987, type Vb dated to 1070-980 BC (Aston) and the other one in Istanbul Topkapi Museum 10.837

Ankhefenkhonsu (II) – anxf-n-xnsw
A.33 (second series, shabti attribution by Aubert to BeG)
God’s father of Amen, Overseer of the metallurgists in the domain of Amen, Chief Wab-priest allowed to stay before Amen in Karnak

Coffins JE 29630 + JE 29729 in Copenhagen Inv.no. 3910

Funerary papyri
BD in the Vatican Inv.no. 19651 (Aston pg. 168)
BA S.R.IV.1003, Cairo 52, see Sadek pg. 169-17

Ankhefenkhonsu (II), Contribution à l’étude de l’Amdouat, © Sadek 1985, C21 Planche 32, for description see page 169-172

Ankhefenkhonsu – anxf-n-xnsw
A.3

Wab-priest of Amen
Coffins JE 29690 in Madrid Inv.no. IC: + MB: 18256
No shabtis attributed

Ankhefenkhonsu – anxf-n-xnsw
A.63

Title unknown
Coffins JE 29684 in Istanbul Inv.no. 10892
No shabtis attributed

Ankhefenkhonsu – anxf-n-xnsw
A.112

Wab-priest of Amen
Coffins no. unknown
No shabtis attributed

Ankhefenkhonsu (I) – anxf-n-xnsw
A.108 (first series)
Worker MNA E93 10.6 cm, overseer MNA E95 10.4 cm
Museu Nacional de Arqueologia, Lisboa
No headband (fillet). There are short and long examples of this type. A worker A154907-0 in Washington is 12.4 cm
Photo: VB 2009

Ankhefenkhonsu (II) – anxf-n-xnsw
A.33 (second series)
Worker approx. 10.4 cm
Photo: unknown

Shabti box of Ankhefenkhonsu (I) type Vb in Istanbul, Topkapi Museum 10837, attributed to A.108
The shabtis lined up in the box are not of Ankhefenkhonsu
Photo: VB 2007

In Monuments égyptiens – notice sommaire – Musée impérial ottoman by Scheil, 1898 pg. 21 a type V box is mentioned for Ankefenkhonsu. The dimensions don’t match with the one in the Topkapi (length 80 cm by depth or height 62 cm). Compared with the Topkapi box the depth or height should be around 30% of the length. If it exists, it may belong to A.33 as the Topkapi one is attributed to A.108

Second shabti box of Ankhefenkhonsu (I) type Vb in Berlin BM 11987. This box may belong to A.108

Ankhefenkhonsu A.33 with his hands raised in worship before Osiris, who is standing with his feet straight on the ground. Detail from Contribution à l’étude de l’Amdouat, Planche 32 b and c. See Sadek, pg. 172 fig. 39

Ankhefenmut C – anxf-n-mwt
Daressy A.140
Also known as Ankhefenmout, Anchefenmut
Ranke I, pg. 67, 8
The name means ‘He lives for Mut’

God’s father of Amen, God’s father of Mut the great, mistress of Isheru

Son of HPA Menkheppera A and (half-)brother of Pinedjem II, Hori, TjaneferGautseshenu A and Meretamen

Coffins JE 29730 = JE 29741) OC: CG-6093-6092, IC: CG-6091|6095, MB: CG-6094 (Brunton & Guēraud). In Aston OC: CG-6064 usurped from Tenetmerpare, IC: CG-6065 and MB: CG-6066. The coffins have been dated to the period c. 1010-965 BC.
NB. In Vienna we can see a beautiful lid of an inner coffin of a namesake from the Bab el Gasus tomb KHM 6267A belonging to Daressy A.68 (no shabtis known)

Funerary papyri
BD S.R.VII.10652 = T.14/7/35/9, Cairo 105

BA S.R.VII.10274, Cairo 103

Amduat papyrus for Ankhefenmut
Length 128 cm, height 36 cm
See Ankhefenmut C, Contribution à l’étude de l’Amdouat, © Sadek 1985, C20 Planche 31-32, for description see page 163-168
Panorama view, VB 2021

Newberry has registered 5 workers and 5 overseers in the Cairo Museum CG 48160-48169

Ankhefenmut C – anxf-n-mwt
Worker Louvre E22075 12.8 cm, overseer Cairo 7953 approx. 12.5 cm
Photo: worker unknown, overseer VB 2015

More info in Schlögl/Brodbeck 1990 pg. 150-151

Detail of the Amduat of papyrus Ankhefenmut C, Sadek, pg. 166 fig. 37

This scene has some peculiarities which are due to mistakes of drawing made by a distracted scribe and rectified by himself. The giant snake represents twice as well as the ground lines. As for the divinities who haul the boat, he has put them on the lower ground, and from the old line of the original ground he has made the towing rope coming out of the mouth of the lower snake

The crew of the bark is composed of two goddesses, seated at the front of the boat. The first one is Maat, the second topped by the sun disk and horns, can be Hathor, or Isis, or simply the goddess Nbt-wiA who always appears in the representations of the Amdouat at this place. In the middle of the boat stands standing under a kiosk the criocephalic god. Behind him, at the rear of the two gods are seated in the boat

Ankhesenmut – anxs-n-mwt
Daressy A.38
Also known as Ankhesenmout, Anchesenmut
Ranke I, pg. 67, 20
The name means ‘She lives for Mut’

Mistress of the House, Chantress of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, Musician of the choir of Mut

Liliane Aubert (pg. 58) suggests that Ankhesenmut could be Hor’s daughter, based on the London BM EA10036 and Richemond papyri belonging to a Henuttawy (Niwinski 1989 p. 330 and 364)

Coffins JE 29675 in Cairo OC: CG-6158-6159, IC: CG-6147-6148, MB: CG-6149

Funerary papyri
BD S.R.VII.10255, Cairo 90
BD S.R.IV.528 – JE 95637, Cairo 4, suggested to attribute to Ankhesenmut, Aubert, pg. 58

One shabti box noted by Bouriant B.46

Pontificate of Pinedjem II, c. 1001-976 BC (Aston)

Newberry has registered 20 workers in Cairo CG 48190-48209

Zarli suggests the existence of a second series based on shape and writing. In this series the throne of Osiris and the flowers at the bottom are depicted from left to right. This is not really out of the ordinary as it occurs on more shabtis. The body is thicker. We also see this more often with shabtis that are made of clay, they can deviate up to about 10% in width, thickness and length. In my opinion, only one series has been made. Here is a comparison between the two writing styles. The Cairo one compared with a shabti from a Dutch private collection, photo: NH 2021. Here another overview

See The Tomb of the Priests of Amun, 2019, p. 353-354 and for more photo’s Araújo pg. 607-610

Ankhesenmut – anxs-n-mwt
Worker Cairo Museum 7950 approx. 12 cm
Photo: VB 2015

Shabti box of Ankhesenmut, noted by Bouriant in Daressy as B.46

Most likely a scene from the Book of the Death 0f Ankhesenmut in the Cairo Museum
Could be a scene of BD S.R.IV.528 – JE 95637 also for an Ankhesenmut but not attributed to A.38, Liliane Aubert suggests this one belongs also to our Bab el Gasus lady
Photo: Flickr © Hans Ollermann 2016

Baakenbaak – bAk-n-bAk
Not in Daressy
Not in Ranke
The name means ‘The servant of the servant’?

Newberry registered some series with the remark ‘Not in Daressy’. And indeed, neither Bouriant nor Daressy have noted Bakenbak. One might think that Newberry has assumed that this shabti came from the Bab el Gasus cache. For the sake of completeness, I have included the series in this overview. The names of the shabtis of which it is not certain whether they come from the Bab el Gasus tomb is shown in italics

Newberry has registered 4 workers CG 46597-46600

Baakenbaak – bAk-n-bAk
Worker Cairo Museum 9.5 cm
Photo: Newberry III, Pl. XXXVIII CG 46597

Bakenmut (I) – bAk-n-mwt
Daressy A.94
Also known as Bakenmout, Baakenmut
Ranke I, pg. 91, 9
The name means ‘The servant of Mut’

God’s father of Mut the great, mistress of Isheru, Wab-priest, Goldsmith in the domain of Amen

Coffins JE 29714 in Istanbul Inv.no.-10866-10868

Funerary papyri
BD S.R.IV.982 = JE 95880, Cairo 45

Book of the Dead for Bakenmut (I)
Length ? cm, height 24 cm
See Niwinski Studies on the illustrated Theban Funerary Papyri 1989 plate 21a-21b
Panorama view, VB 2021

Bakenmut (I), Mythological Papyri 1957, © Piankoff and Rambova Plate 20, for description see page 163-168

Newberry has registered 10 workers without title, 2 workers with the title Wab-priest of Amen, 1 worker with the title God’s father of Mut and 8 overseers CG 46604-46623, CG 46697

Bakenmut (I) – bAk-n-mwt
Worker Amiens France approx. 9.5 cm, overseer 9 cm Florence Inv.no. 8547, see The tomb of the priests of Amun, 2019, pg. 358-360
Photo: worker VB 2012, overseer internet © The tomb of the priests of Amun

Bakenmut (I), wearing the festal cone with a lotus bud, stands in the attitude of prayer before the enthroned Osiris who holds the crook and the flagellum. Behind
Osiris, on the mat on which stands the throne of the god, are Isis and N ephthys, both holding the sign of life in each hand. A small altar is before each goddess. Between the figure of Bakenmut and Osiris is an altar piled with offerings: a bunch of leeks, loaves of bread, and baskets of fruit
Mythological Papyri 1957, © Piankoff and Rambova detail Plate 20, text pg. 20

Bakenmut (II) – bAk-(n)-mwt
Daressy A.40
Also known as Bakenmout, Baakenmut
Ranke I, pg. 91, 9
The name means ‘The servant of Mut’

God’s father of Amen-Re, the king of the gods

Coffins JE 29650 in BM, London Inv.no. BM OC: EA24792, IC: EA24798 and MB: EA24799

One shabti box (type VIb) in Cleveland CMA 14.719 acquired in 1914, name and title are correct but exact provenance is unknown

Newberry has registered 5 workers CG 48136-48140

Registration by Daressy at Bakenmut (I) A.94

Bakenmut (II) – bAk-(n)-mwt
Worker approx. 11 cm, see for more photo’s Araújo pg. 712-714. Here four workers in private collections
Photo: Niek de Haan

Shabti box of Bakenmut (II) type VIb
Cleveland CMA 14.719 acquired in 1914, name and title are correct but exact provenance is unknown, 44.6 cm x 28 cm
Photo: website Cleveland Museum

Dikhonsuiry – di-xnsw-iry
Daressy A.49
Also known as Dikhonsouiry, Diekhonsiri, Dikhonsuiri, Dichonsiri
Ranke I, pg. 397, 17
The name means ‘Khonsu gives a companion’

God’s father of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, Scribe of the domain of Amen, Royal scribe, Wab-priest at the prow of the barque of Khonsu

During the examination of the Bab el Gasus coffins in Leiden, the name (in hieratic) of a namesake was found at the coffin of A.47. He may have been part of a team that had to bring the coffins to safety (RMO magazine no. 36 pg. 28)

Coffins JE 29733 in Cairo OC: CG-6266-6267, IC: CG-6263|6265, MB: CG-6264

Funerary papyrus
BA S.R.VII.10236, Cairo 73

Amduat papyrus for Dikhonsuiry
Length 213 cm, height 24 cm
See Contribution à l’étude de l’Amdouat, Sadek 1985, C26 Planche 37-38, for description see page 186-192
Panorama view, VB 2021

Two shabti boxes were noted by Bouriant B.67 and B.68. One of them (type Vb) is in Florence Inv.no. 8531
Pontificate of Pinedjem II c. 1001-976 BC

No registration in Newberry

Dikhonsuiry – di-xnsw-iry
Worker British Museum EA24861 9.4 cm , overseer (based on typology) Lisboa MNA-E106 10.2 cm
Photo: © The Trustees of the British Museum, overseer © Estatuetas funerárias Egípcias da XXI dinastia, 2002 pg. 770

Shabti box of Dikhonsuiry in Florence Inv.no. 8531 type Vb, noted by Bouriant in Daressy as B.67 or B.68
Photo: Internet © The tomb of the priests of Amun 2019, pg. 472-473, height 43.5, width 64.5, depth 34 cm (photo of lids on pg. 476)

Second shabti box of Dikhonsuiry type Vb noted by Bouriant in Daressy B.67 or B.68. The whereabouts are unknown

Djedkhonsuiufankh (I) – Dd-xnsw-iwf-anx
Daressy A.141 or A.8 or A.107
Also known as Djedkhonsouioufankh, Djedkhonsefankh, Djedkhonsuiuefankh
Ranke I, pg. 412, 4
The name means ‘Khonsu has said, he will live’

God’s father of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, Steward, Overseer of the double Granary, Chief scribe of Amen-Re

The owner of A.141 is the son of Shedsuhor

In several publications the Wab-priest Djedkhonsuiufankh has been linked to A.141 but given the lack of the correct title this seems incorrect. A papyrus found in A.141 confirms the title ‘Overseer of the double Granary’ who, as far we know, was not a Wab-priest

Three or four namesakes were buried in the Bab el Gasus and no definitive attribution can be made.

The ‘Overseer of the graneries’ series that surfaced shortly after the find is to be considered as owner of A.141 due to its title and design. Unfortunately, the ‘Overseer of the Granaries’ shabtis were not included in the lots that went to the 17 countries in 1893, but there is evidence that this series was sold to collectors soon after its discovery. Miguel Ángel Escobar Clarós, who examined the journey of the series in 2008, has found several indications to support this theory (not published yet)

No registration in Newberry

Djedkhonsuiufankh – Dd-xnsw-iwf-anx
A.8

Coffins JE 29688 in France at the Louvre IC: E10636, in Lyon MB: E10637 Inv. no. H2322, see Dautant/Jamen, see ‘Inventory of the yellow coffins in the French museums’. There are several coffins with the same name and one of them (N.2585) belonged to a Djedkhonsefankh, son of Nespernub dated c. 930-880 BC), the other coffins are of later date and cannot be part of the B&G find, see Aston p. 165

Djedkhonsuiufankh – Dd-xnsw-iwf-anx
A.107
Wab-priest of Amen-Re, the king of the gods
Coffins unknown, only mummy with his name and title and the funerary papyrus
BA S.R.IV.932 = JE 95835, Cairo 30

Djedkhonsuiufankh A.107, fragment BD © Niwinski Studies on the illustrated Theban Funerary Papyri 1989 plate 42a

Djedkhonsuiufankh – Dd-xnsw-iwf-anx
A.141

God’s father of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, Steward, Overseer of the double Granary, Chief scribe of Amen-Re

Son of Shedsuhor (Niwinski pg. 142)

Coffins JE 29620 and JE 29626 (supposedly sent to Russia but still in Cairo, Aston 2009)

Funerary papyri
BA S.R.VII.11498 = T.14/7/35/2, Cairo 120

Amduat papyrus for Djedkhonsuiufankh
Length 615 cm, height 28 cm
See Contribution à l’étude de l’Amdouat, Sadek 1985, C28 Planche 39-41, for description see page 196-208
Panorama view, VB 2021

BA S.R.VII.10266 = 14/7/35/4, Cairo 95

Djedkhonsuiufankh, Mythological Papyri 1957, © Piankoff and Rambova Plate 22, for description see page 171-176. Because the papyrus is more than 7 metres long, I have split the image above into two for display purposes

Two shabti boxes Cairo JE 29286 and JE 29287

Djedkhonsuiufankh – Dd-xnsw-iwf-anx
A.( – )?
In Niwinski there are two other papyri for a Djedkhonsuiufankh that probably come from Bab el Gasus (Cairo 20 and 96)

20 – Wab-priest of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, Great singer of West-Thebes
BD SRIV.557 = JE 95659, Cairo 20

Book of the Dead for Djedkhonsuiufankh
Length 139 cm, height 23 cm
Panorama view, VB 2021

96 – Wab-priest of Amen, God’s father of Djehuty, lord of Hermapolis, Scribe, Overseer of the double Granary, Chief scribe of Amen-Re, the king of the gods
BA S.R.VII.10267, Cairo 96

Both papyri are not linked to a Daressy coffin, so it is impossible to determine where they belong, but both seem a good candidate for the shabti with the Wab-priest title, that one is certainly from the Bab el Gasus find


Djedkhonsuiufankh (I) – Dd-xnsw-iwf-anx (I)
A.141
(presumptive owner) – Overseer of the double Granary
Not proven to come from Bab el Gasus but imho most likely the owner of A.141 and son of Shedsuhor
S
ee Schlögl/Brodbeck 1990, pg. 221 (rejected by Liliane Aubert) and for the hieroglyphs Niwinski pg. 142. Araújo also attributes this shabti to Bab el Gasus but to A.8, son of Nespernub
Worker ex-VB1166 10.7 cm, overseer Dutch private collection 10.8 cm. See for another overseer Schlick-Nolte/V. von Droste zu Hülshoff 1982, Rhein-Main 2, 134-135 (Mainz, Mittelrheinisches Landesmuseum)
Photo: VB 2017, overseer unknown

Djedkhonsuiufankh (II) – Dd-xnsw-iwf-anx (II)
Candidates for this shabti are the
Wab-priest A.107 (on the cloth of his mummy he bears the title Wab-priest of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, Liliane Aubert)
Wab-priest of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, Great singer of West-Thebes. A.(-)?
as the owner of the Book of the Death SRIV.557 = JE 95659
Wab-priest of Amen, God’s father of Djehuty, lord of Hermapolis, Scribe, Overseer of the double Granary, Chief scribe of Amen-Re, the king of the gods. A.(-)?
as owner of BA S.R.VII.10267

Worker MAEC, Museo dell’Accademia Etrusca e della Città di Cortona approx. 12.5 cm
Photo: Niek de Haan 2010

Shabti box of Djedkhonsuiufankh in Cairo JE 29286

Second shabti box of Djedkhonsuiufankh in Cairo JE 29287

Djedkhonsuiufankh A.141. Detail of the Amduat papyrus, Sadek, pg. 200 fig. 52

Djedkhonsuiufankh A.141 in adoration is preceded by five columns of text:
Invocation to Re in the Evening Barge, making Re satisfied in the Morning Barge. Adoration of Re by Osiris, Chief of the Granaries, Great Scribe of Amon-Re, King of the Gods, Djedkhonsuiufankh, the justified one. Offerings are given him in the West, as to every just one. Behind him a crocodile-headed goddess holding two knives and a serpent
Detail of second and third vignette of the Amduat papyrus, Mythological Papyri 1957, © Piankoff and Rambova detail Plate 22

Djedmaatiusankh – Dd-mAat-iws-anx
Daressy A.109
Also known as Djedmaatiouesankh, Djedmaatesankh, Djedmaatiuesach
Ranke I, pg. 410, 13, Ranke II, pg. 401
The name means ‘Maat has said, she will live’

Mistress of the house, Chantress of Amen-Re, the king of the gods

Coffins JE 29660 (usurped from Tenetwenemheretib) OC: CG-6213-6214, IC: CG-6182-6183, MB: CG-6184

Funerary papyri in Cairo
BA S.R.IV.542 = JE 95645, Cairo 8

Amduat papyrus for Djedmaatiusankh
Length 146 cm, height 23 cm
Panorama view, VB 2021

BA S.R.IV.553 = JE 95655, Cairo 16

Amduat papyrus for Djedmaatiusankh
Length 155 cm, height 23 cm
Panorama view, VB 2021

One shabti box (type VIa) in the Vatican Inv. No. 1252, the other one (type VIa) T.4/12/24/4 (exhibition no. 9102, Aston, The Shabti Box, 1994) in Cairo
See The Shabti Box: A Typological Study – David A. Aston pg. 29-30 for a description of both boxes
Pontificate HPA Menkheperra A c. 1051-1001 BC

Newberry has incorrectly attributed these 5 workers and 4 overseers to A.110, CG 48141-48149

Djedmaatiusankh – Dd-mAat-iws-anx
Worker Washington A154936-0 approx. 11.5 cm, overseer Cairo CG 48146 11 cm
Photo: Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Fascicle 3, Le Caire, 1957, Indices and Planches, plate XXXIX
Another overseer in the Cairo Museum has a black wig and white fillet, photo VB 2015. In Newberry the wigs of the overseers are white with a black fillet

Shabti box of Djedmaatiusankh type VIa
Vatican Inv. No. 1252, photo side and back view
Photos: VB 2013

Second shabti box of Djedmaatiusankh type VIa in Cairo Inv. No. T.4/12/24/4, exhibition no. 910, see Aston pg. 365, photo side view
Photos: Internet

Djedmutiusankh – Dd-mwt (-iws-anx)
A.110 by Daressy, A.45 by Aubert and another namesake A.150
Also known as Djedmout, Djedmoutiouesankh, Djedmutesankh
Ranke I, pg. 410, 16
The name means ‘Mut has said, she will live’
Djedmut is an abbreviation of Djedmutiusankh
Chantress of Amen

There are three coffins registered by Daressy on which the name Djedmutiusankh appears. The ladies all have the title of singer of Amen. In the Bouriant/Daressy list the shabtis are linked to A.110, but this may not seem the right choice. Liliane Aubert links them to A.45 because on the Osiris shroud (Cairo SR 14388, which comes from A.45) the name Djedmut is shown as on her shabtis. Also, in Niwinski the shorter name seems to appear, see pg. 143

Not connected to a coffin is papyrus
BD S.R.VII.10223, Cairo 60

Book of the Dead for Djedmutiusankh
Length 126 cm, height 13 cm
Panorama view, VB 2021

Several shabtis in this group have an unique feature. Instead of text they have a hastily painted pattern of horizontal lines in a vertical frame

One shabti box (type VIb) in Stockholm NME 896

Newberry has registered 15 workers and 10 overseers CG 48074-48086, CG 48107-48118. Two workers have a full inscription, 13 workers have a frame with horizontal lines under the inscription, 5 overseers have a frame on the front and inscription on the side and 5 overseers have a frame only

Djedmutiusankh – Dd-mwt (-iws-anx)
A.45
(attribution by Aubert)
Chantress of Amen
Coffin JE 29652 in Istanbul Inv. No. 10872 by Niwinski and CG-6070-6072 in Cairo by Aston
Osiris shroud SR 14388 in Cairo

Djedmutiusankh – Dd-mwt (-iws-anx)
A.110 (attribution by Bouriant/Daressy)
Chantress of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, Great musician of the choir of Mut
Coffin JE 29679 (usurped from Shedsutaipet, according Aston) in Lisbon, but Niwinski links this coffin to A.150 and attributes an unknown coffin to the collection in Lisbon

Djedmutiusankh – Dd-mwt (-iws-anx)
A.150
Chantress of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, Great musician of the choir of Mut on the Coffin JE 29679, in Cairo Inv. no. OC: CG-6113-(6114) IC: CG-6088|6090 MB: CG-6089, attribution by Niwinski, also in P&M I pg. 635. Aston attributes this coffin to A.110 and mentions a coffin for this owner in Dresden Inv.no Aeg 782 (pg. 193)

Two small papyri, one in Cairo no no. (C 25 in Sadek). The titles Mistress of the house, Chantress of Amen are on papyrus C 25 found on the mummy

Funerary papyrus BA S.R.VII.10220, Cairo 57

Amduat papyrus for Djedmutiusankh
Length 92 cm, height 13 cm
See Contribution à l’étude de l’Amdouat, Sadek 1985, C25 Planche 36, for description see page 183-185
Panorama view, VB 2021

Djedmutiusankh – Dd-mwt(-iws-anx)
A.45
(attribution by Aubert, A.110 in Daressy)
Worker Washington A154915-0 approx. 9 cm
Photo: Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History

Here two workers in the Cairo Museum with a frame with horizontal lines

Probably the overseers were made the same as the workers, except that a whip was painted in addition to the hoes, see Newberry’s notes

Shabti box of Djedmutiusankh type VIb
Stockholm NME 896
Photo: Niek de Haan 2009

Dyrepu – dy-rpw
Daressy A.123
Also known as Derepou, Direpu, Dirpu
Not in Ranke
Her name suggests she was of Nubian or Ethiopian descent (Bruyère, 1939)

Mistress of the house, Chantress of Amen-Re, the king of the gods

Coffins JE 29669 in Cairo OC: CG-6117-6118, IC: CG-6083-6084, MB: CG-6085 (Niwinski) CG-6059-6061 (Aston)

Funerary papyri
BD S.R.IV.960 = JE 95860, Cairo 39

BA S.R.VII.10257, Cairo 92

Amduat papyrus for Dyrepu
Length 267 m, height 23,5 cm
See Mythological Papyri 1957, Piankoff and Rambova Plate 6, for description see page  84-87
Panorama view, VB 2021

Two shabti boxes (type VIb) in Cairo Inv.no. JE 29281 and JE 29291 dated c. 1000-950 BC (Aston)

No registration in Newberry

Dyrepu- dy-rpw
Worker approx. 8 cm
Photo: unknown

Shabti box of Dyrepu type VIb in Cairo JE 29281

Second shabti box of Dyrepu type VIb in Cairo JE 29291

A looped cobra is placed above a sign of heaven. Below, a divinity with the body of Bes and the head of Anubis, holding a serpent and two knives, represents one of the
doorkeepers of the infernal gates.

Dyrepu, wearing the usual headdress and carrying a spindle, is led by a cat-headed goddess toward a figure of the standing Osiris holding the crook and the flagellum. The goddess has a large sign of life attached to her arm. At her feet is Am-mut, the Devourer of the unjustified souls, holding a knife between its forepaws. Behind Osiris a Horus hawk wearing the Atef-crown is perched on the West sign
Mythological Papyri 1957, Piankoff and Rambova detail Plate 6, text pg. 85-86
Photo: VB 2021

Gautseshenu A – gAwt-sSnw
2 types
Daressy A.152
Also known as Gautseshen, Gautsechen, Gautseschenu
Ranke I, pg. 350, 6
The name means ‘The bundle of lotus flowers’

Mistress of the house, Superior of the harem of Amen in the third phyle (or Great chief of Amen’s sacred musical troupe in the third phyle), Superior of the harem of Montu, lord of Thebes, Chantress of Amen, Great musician of Mut

Liliane Aubert does not use the term ‘harem’ and writes that Gautseshenu is part of ‘du corps musical sacre d’Amon’, the sacred musical body (group/troupe) of Amen. I could not find further reference for it, so I mention both translations

She was the daughter of HPA Menkheperra A and Isetemkhebit C and was married to her half-brother Tjanefer and was (half-)sister of Pinedjem II, Hori, TjaneferAnkhefenmut and Meretamen. Her daughter is Gautseshenu B

Coffins in Cairo Inv.no. 29635, OC: + IC: + MB: no CG-number known

Funerary papyri
BD S.R.IV.936 = JE 95838 = CG 40012, Cairo 32
BA S.R.VII.10265 = 14/7/35/3, Cairo 94, see Sadek 95-98

Gautseshenu A, Contribution à l’étude de l’Amdouat, © Sadek 1985, C3 Planche 8-9, for description see page 95-98

One shabti box in Cairo?

Burial can be dated to pontificate Pinedjem II and Amenemope c. 1001-992 BC (Aston 194-195)

Newberry has registered 10 workers CG 46789-46793 (5x type 1) and CG 46794-46798 (5x type 2) and 10 overseers CG 46799-46803 (5x type 1) and CG 47081-47085 (5x type 2)

Gautseshenu A – gAwt-sSnw A
Type 1
Worker shabticollections SC/70 12.2 cm, overseer Louvre E22121 13.5 cm
See other overseer 14 cm CG 46800 and worker 12.5 cm CG 46789 in Newberry, plate XXXVI
Photo: worker shabticollections.com, overseer internet

Gautseshenu A – gAwt-sSnw A
Type 2
Worker Lisboa MNA approx. 10 cm, overseer Christie’s 2012 7207 L48 11.1 cm
Photo: worker VB 2009, overseer Christie’s 2012

Shabti box Gautseshenu A in Cairo?
Daressy, RT 17, (1895), 114 (lxxxviii)
Aston pg. 194

Gautseshenu B – gAwt-sSnw
Daressy A.139
Also known as Gautseshen, Gautsechen, Gautseschenu
Ranke I, pg. 350, 6
The name means ‘The bundle of lotus flowers’

Mistress of the house, Chantress of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, Chantress in the domain of Mut (on the coffin in Leiden)

In Bab El-Gasus in Context: Rediscovering the Tomb of the priests of Amun 2021, pg. 207 Alba Maria Villar Gómez names the following titles on coffin CG-6013: xnmtt n xnsw pA-xrd – Wet nurse of Khonsu the child and Hryt tiwt – (translation unknown to me)

Daughter of Gautseshenu A
Coffins JE 29617 in Cairo Inv.no. CG-6010-6011 (CG-6012 usurped from Nesamunnestawy) now in Leiden Inv.no OC: F93/10.1a, IC: F93/10.1b, MB: F93/10.1c, see ‘De reis van de kisten, 2013’

Funerary papyri
MP S.R.IV.944 = JE 95846 = CG 58002, Cairo G

BD S.R.IV.1001, Cairo 51

BA S.R.IV.10221, Cairo 58

Amduat papyrus for Gautseshenu B
Length 230 m, height 23 cm
See Gautseshenu B, Contribution à l’étude de l’Amdouat, Sadek 1985, C19 Planche 30-31, for a description see pg. 159-162
Panorama view, VB 2021

Pontificate of Pinedjem II c. 1001-976 BC

Newberry has registered 1 worker CG 46815 and 2 (3) overseers CG 46817-46818. Probably CG 46816 also belongs to this series and Newberry has not been able to read hieroglyphs properly. The shape of the shabtis is quite unique and there is a good chance that this overseer is part of it, especially because Newberry himself also refers to it, see his comment at CG 46817

Gautseshenu B – gAwt-sSnw B
Worker shabticollections.com SC/55 10.4 cm, overseer Lisboa MNA E83 10.4 cm
Photo: worker shabticollections.com, overseer VB 2009
See other overseer 10.5 cm CG 46818 and back of the worker 10.7 cm CG 46815 in Newberry, plate XXXVII and XL

Detail of the Amduat papyrus
Gautseshenu B on the right offering a vase of ointment to the god Re-Horakhty. The presence of Re-Horakhty in a label of a papyrus of the Amdouat properly is a rarity
For a description see Sadek, pg. 159-162 fig. 36
Photo: VB 2021

Henuttawy E – Hnwt-tAwy
2 types
Daressy A.64
Also known as Henouttaouy, Henuttaui, Henettawy
Ranke I, pg. 244, 12
The name means ‘The lady of the Two Lands’

The noble lady, Chantress of Amen-Re, Musician of the choir of Mut

Coffins JE 29656 (usurped from Nestanebettawy) in Cairo OC: CG-6052|6050, IC: CG-6049-6048, MB: CG-6051, in Aston a reference to Seconde trouvaille, 27-45 of Niwinski CG-6036-6040

Funerary papyrus
BA S.R.IV.1531, Cairo 54
Pontificate of Menkheperra A c. 1051-1001 BC

Daressy noted two sets of coffins attributed to a Henuttay, A.136 JE 29614 now in Lisbon and A.64 (above) to which the shabtis have been assigned

Two types of this group were found, one group has an average size of 9.5 cm and the second group 12.5. Newberry also found a 14.5 cm overseer CG 48313, but I doubt if he belongs to this group

Newberry has registered 5 workers and 4 overseers of type 1 (9.5 cm) and 5 workers and 1 overseer for type 2 (12.5 cm) and an overseer of 14.5 cm under CG 47066-47080, CG 47864, CG 48313

Henuttawy E – Hnwt-tAwy E
Type 1 – ca. 9.5 cm
Worker Washington A154935-0 approx. 9 cm
Photo: worker Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History

Henuttawy E – Hnwt-tAwy E
Type 2 – ca. 12.5 cm
Worker estimated 12.5 cm, overseer 12.8 cm Brussels Musées royaux d’art et d’histoire E.05426b

Photo: worker unknown, overseer Catalogue en ligne du musée des MRAH

Herytubekhet – Hryt-wbxt
Daressy A.133
Also known as Heroubekht, Herouben, Harweben, Herytuben, Heroub, Herubechet, Heruben
Ranke I, pg. 253, 6, Ranke II, pg. 379
The name means poetically translated ‘Luminous firmament (the vault of the heavens)’, Aubert pg. 82
She is named Harweben in Aston, Herytuben by Prof. Niwinski and Heroub by Brunton & Guēraud

Mistress of the house, Chantress of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, Overseer of the harem of Amen in the fourth phyle (or Great chief of Amen’s sacred musical troupe in the fourth phyle), Second prophetess of Mut at the temple of birth, Third prophetess of Mut the great, mistress of Isheru

NB. Instead of ‘harem’ Liliane Aubert translates this part of the title as ‘du corps musical sacre’. Alba Maria Villar Gómez translates this part as ‘sacred musical troupe’

NB. In Bab El-Gasus in Context: Rediscovering the Tomb of the priests of Amun 2021, pg. 196 Alba Maria Villar Gómez names another unfortunately unspecified object with the important title ‘God’s mother of Khonsu (the child)) that was found in the funerary assemblage of Herytubekhet, a title that was also recorded for her mother Isetemkhebit D. I am curious as to which object this is about, as on her papyri only ‘God’s mother of Khonsu’ is listed with her mother and she seems/is not connected to the cult of Khonsu, see pg. 197

Daughter of Isetemkhebit D (Royal Cache) and granddaughter of HPA Menkherrere A

Coffins JE 29738 Cairo Inv.no. OC: CG-6275|6277, IC: CG-6276|6273, MB: CG-6474

Funerary papyri
BD S.R.VII.10256 = T.14/7/35/6, Cairo 91

Book of the Dead for Herytubekhet
Length 198 cm, height 23.5 cm
See for description Mythological Papyri 1957, Piankoff and Rambova page  71-74 and Plate 1
Panorama view, VB 2021

Amduat papyrus for Herytubekhet
Length 191 cm, height 23.5 cm
See for description Mythological Papyri 1957, Piankoff and Rambova page 75-76 and Plate 2
Panorama view, VB 2021

Sadek states that three papyri were found and that this anonymous one also belongs to Herytbekhet. This papyrus was also given the old inventory number 133 and as such is linked to this owner. The papyrus has the same height as the other two and possibly these three papyri were found rolled up together between the mummy’s legs. The manuscript includes divisions X to XII of the Grand Amdouat

Contribution à l’étude de l’Amdouat
Length 147 cm, height 23.5 cm
Attributed to Herytubekhet by Sadek 1985, C5 Planche 11. See for description see page 104-105
Panorama view, VB 2021

Two shabti boxes (type Vb), one in Vienna KHM 6253 and one in Florence 8529
Pontificate of Psusennes III c. 976-944 BC

Newberry has registered 5 workers of 11 cm and 5 overseers of 13.2 cm CG 46624-46628, CG 47126-47130

Herytubekhet – Hryt-wbxt
Worker MAEC, Museo dell’Accademia Etrusca e della Città di Cortona 10.5 cm, overseer in Cairo Museum with whip in right hand and long whip resting at the lower leg in the left hand, approx. 10 cm. Newberry lists them as 11 cm (1) and 13.2 cm (4)
Photo: worker Niek de Haan 2010, overseer VB 2015

Here a modified worker as overseer with (royal) beard 10.6 cm. For another overseer without beard? see shabticollections.com SC/69 and Janes, Shabtis 60a and 60b
Photo: worker Niek de Haan 2010, overseer Niek de Haan 2020

There are two types of this series and these differ, especially in size. The first type averages 10-11 cm and the second type averages 12-13 cm. The group of small and large overseers consists of modified workers with crossed arms holding a whip in the right hand and standard executed overseers with the right arm over the chest holding a whip and the other arm hanging down with or without whip

Shabti box of Herytubekhet type Vb
Florence Inv.no. 8529
Photo: Internet ©  The tomb of the priests of Amun 2019 pg. 475-476

Second shabti box of Herytubekhet type Vb
Detail with the name of the owner in the second register from the left
Vienna KHM 6253
Photo: VB 2006

Herytubekhet and the baboon of Thoth adore the solar disk. The representation of the disk symbolizes the eternity of its movement. Between the two lions of the horizon, sitting back to back, is the skull of a bull. On it is placed the solar disk surrounded by a serpent biting its tail – the symbol of eternity. From above a pair of arms embrace the disk which contains a seated child, a finger to his mouth, holding the crook and the flagellum
Mythological Papyri 1957, © Piankoff and Rambova, text pg. 73
Photo: VB 2021

Hor – Hr.i
Daressy A.143
Also known as Hori, Hory
Ranke I, pg. 245, 18
The name means ‘Horus’

God’s servant of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, God’s servant of Anubis and Khonsu, God’s servant of Hathor, mistress of the valley of Thebes, God’s servant of Seth of Sepemerou, God’s father of Mut, God’s father of Khonsu, God’s servant of Khonsu and Sobek, God’s servant of Amen-Re lord of the throne of the two lands of Thebes

Son of HPA Menkheppera A and (half-)brother of Pinedjem II, TjaneferMeretamen, Ankhefenmut C and Gautseshenu ALiliane Aubert (pg. 58) suggests that Ankhesenmut could be Hor’s daughter, based on the London BM EA10036 and Richemond papyri belonging to a Henuttawy (Niwinski 1989 p. 330 and 364)

Coffins JE 29619 (OC: IC: MB: no CG number, see Niwinski pg. 119/202), JE 29704 (outer – Aston)

Funerary papyrus? (Aston)

Pontificate Pinedjem II, coffins have been dated to c. 990-950 BC

See for an overview of known shabtis of Hor in museums and private collections, The shabtis of the Prophet of Amun, Hor by Niek de Haan on shabticollections.com

Newberry registered 10 workers and 14 overseers CG 46570-46589, CG 47171-47174

Incorrectly attributed to A.37

Hor or Hori – Hr.i
Worker Cairo 7665 approx. 11.5 cm, overseer Cairo 7883 approx. 13.5 cm
Photo: VB 2015

Iset (Isis) – Ast
Daressy A.127
Also known as Isis, Aset, Taaatemperimen (tA-aA(.t)-m-pr-imn) or abbreviated Taaatimen
Ranke I, Ast pg. 3, 18, Ranke I tA-aA(.t)-imn pg. 354, 15
The name Iset means ‘Isis’, the name Taaatemperimen means ‘The great one in the domain of Amen’

Chantress of Amen

Sadek 1985 suggests that Ta-aatimen ‘la Grande-dans-le-domaine-d’Amon’ is her nickname and Isis her real name. He writes (translated) “It is unlikely that the basalt scarab with the name of Ast (Isis) was usurped, also it is possible to think that this woman, of priestly rank, bearer of a extremely common anthroponym, at one point felt the to distinguish herself from her many companions who were called Isis, by being nicknamed “The great one in the domain of Amen”, perhaps besides, according to a current title of the goddess Isis in Thebaine region”. See L. Sadek, pg. 120-121)

Coffins JE 29672 (Niwinski) Inv.no. CG-6162-6163 (Aston)

Funerary papyri
MP S.R.IV.990 = JE 95886 = CG 58026, Cairo J

BD S.R.IV.549 = JE 95651, Cairo 14

Book of the Dead for Iset
Length 535 cm, height 25 cm
Panorama view, VB 2021

Amduat papyrus for Iset / Taaatemperimen
Length 94 cm, height 23 cm
See Contribution à l’étude de l’Amdouat, Sadek 1985, C9 Planche 17, for description see page 120-124
Panorama view, VB 2021

BA Inv.no. unknown

Iset (Isis), Contribution à l’étude de l’Amdouat, © Sadek 1985, C15 Planche 25, for description see page 143-144. The inventory number of this second BA papyrus in Cairo is unknown. The papyrus is 140 cm long and 19 cm high

Maybe mother of Amenhotep
Pontificate Pinedjem II

No registration in Newberry

Iset (Isis) – Ast
Worker Petrie Museum UC40025 10.2 cm
Photo: Petrie Museum

In the small temple (naos), Osiris sits on a throne, which is placed on a covered pedestal. Close to him, at his feet, stands the emblem of Anubis. On the right, Iset is standing before the god, her hands raised in a gesture of adoration. She is dressed in a tight dress. Detail of the Amduat papyrus, Sadek, pg. 123 fig. 19

Isety – Ast.y
Daressy A.66
Also known as Isty, Isis, Asty
Ranke I, pg. 4, 13
The name means ‘Isis’

Mistress of the house, Chantress of Amen-Re, the king of the gods

Coffins JE 29654 in Cairo Inv.no. OC: CG-6198-6199, IC: CG-6164-6165, MB: CG-6161

Funerary papyri
MP S.R.IV.989 = JE 95885 = CG 58001, Cairo I, for an Ast (Niwinski attributed the papyrus to A.127, Aston to A.66, see Aston pg. 175)

BD FM 31326, Chicago 1

Isety, Left side of the Book of the Dead Inv.no. FM 31326 in the Field Museum, Chicago. Here another photo of the left side by VB 2007 and here a photo of the exhibition in the museum

BA S.R.VII.10239, Cairo 76

Amduat papyrus for Isety
Length 223 cm, height 23 cm
See Sadek 1985 C4, Planche 9 and 10, for a description see pg. 99-103
Panorama view, VB 2021

Two shabti boxes, one (type VIb) in London BM EA24895 and the second one maybe in Sweden, Uppsala Victoria Museum VM0159 (communication Miguel Angel Escobar Clarós – Geoffrey Metz)
Burial pontificate Psusennes II, see discussion Aston pg. 175

Newberry registered 10 workers CG 48064-48073, 5 of 7 cm and 5 from another mould 6 cm

Reference on the B-list

Isety – Ast.y
Worker approx 7 cm Museum Gustavianum, Uppsala
Photo: Niek de Haan 2009

Shabti box of Isety type VIb in London, British Museum Inv.no. EA24895
Rectangular wooden shabti box of the Chantress of Amen Isety. Two vaulted lids and two divisions; exterior painted white with a vertical column of Hieroglyphic text on one sidewall; two round knobs in one side of box and in one lid; one in another lid. Remains of cord attached to lid and box. Stands on two wooden bars attached to base.
Height: 39 cm, length: 42 cm, width: 25 centimetres
Single line of hieroglyphs: The Osiris, Chantress of Amen, Asty
Donated by: Government of the British Protectorate of Egypt
Acquisition date 1893 – 1893,1014.95 – No photo available

Second shabti box of Isety type ?
Maybe discovered in Sweden, Uppsala Victoria Museum VM0159 (communication Miguel Ángel Escobar Clarós – Geoffrey Metz)

Isety is about to be received by Osiris, seated on his throne, and by his consort Isis, standing next to the throne
Detail of the Book of the Dead, Field Museum Chicago, Inv.no. FM 31326. Here another beautiful detail
Photo: Internet

Isetemkhebit – Ast-m-Ax-bit
Daressy A.17, A58, A.62, A.100 or A.126
Also known as Isetemkheb, Isetemkhebi, Istemkheb, Asetemachbit, Asetemakhbit
Ranke I, pg. 4, 3
The name means ‘Isis is in Ipu (Akhmim)

Two shabti series from Isetemkhebit have been attributed to A.126, but it is likely that they are two different ladies. Five different burials have been found named to Isetemkhebit. 

This summary is based on research by Miguel Ángel Escobar Clarós. The allocation of the small series to A.100 is my suggestion because the lovely lady from A.100 may had a relationship with Payefadjer A.99. In the Bab el Gasus cache both shabti versions are unique in size and execution and may be husband and wife. If so, the small shabtis may belong to A.100, as her coffin was right next Payefadjer’s coffin. See the awesome map of Prof. Niwinski in ’21st Dynasty Coffins from Thebes’, pg. 196-197.

The registration of Newberry is included under A.100 and A.126, in total 20 workers and 10 overseers

Isetemkhebit – Ast-m-Ax-bit
A.17

Chantress of Amen
Coffins JE 29699 in Cairo OC: CG-6218-6219, IC: CG-6177-6178, MB: CG-6179 (for Tenetpenherunefer (Aston))

Funerary papyrus
BD S.R.IV.961 = JE 95861, Cairo 40, between the legs of the mummy.

The burial would date to the period c. 963/962-944-BC (Aston)
No shabtis attributed

Isetemkhebit – Ast-m-Ax-bit
A.58

Mistress of the house, Chantress of Amen-Re, the king of the gods
Coffins JE 29640, JE 29689 now in Madrid Inv.no. 18257 (usurped from Ihy by Isetemkhebit K, Aston), funerary papyrus
BA S.R.VII.11490
= 14/7/35/1, Cairo 112

Amduat papyrus for Isetemkhebit
Length 333 cm, height 37 cm
Panorama view, VB 2021

Isetemkhebit – Ast-m-Ax-bit
A.62
Coffins JE 29740 (usurped from Neferetimen) IC: CG-6006|6008, MB: CG-6007 hold also the name Isetemkhebit (Niwinski), funerary papyrus
BD S.R.VII.10655 = 23/4/40/3, Cairo 108
Niwinski suggests to connect coffin JE 29717 (Daressy A.100) OC: CG-6010|6005 as CG-6005a|b to A.62.
Aston mentions the CG-6005 (usurped from Pashedkhons) and dates the coffin to the period c. 1000-930 BC
No shabtis attributed

Isetemkhebit – Ast-m-Ax-bit
A.100
(attribution to Isetemkhebit II by author)
Chantress of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, Musician of the choir of Mut

Coffins 29717 in Cairo OC: CG-6010|6005. Niwinski suggests to connect this coffin (usurped from Pashedkhons by Isetemkhebit) to A.62.
Aston mentions a different coffin set in Cairo IC: CG-6124-6125, MB: CG-6123 (A.126 in Niwinski as 6006a|b)

Newberry has registered 10 workers and 5 overseers CG 47016-47030. He made a mistake with 47021 by noting the wrong size, 12 cm instead of 10 cm. See the following shabtis 47222 – 47230 that also all have the same characteristic light blue colour instead of the darker blue of Isetemkhebit I

Isetemkhebit – Ast-m-Ax-bit
A.126 (attribution to both series by Daressy)
Mistress of the house, Chantress of Amen
Coffins JE 29671 (usurped from Iuenmut) in Cairo Inv.no. OC: CG-6143-6142, IC: CG-6124-6125 (CG 6006a|b), MB: CG-6123
Funerary papyrus
BA S.R.IV.555 = JE 95657, Cairo 18

Amduat papyrus for Isetemkhebit
Length 136 cm, height 23 cm
Panorama view, VB 2021

One shabti box noted by Bouriant B.19
Coffin CG 6006 has been dated to c. 1000-960 BC

Newberry has registered 10 workers and 5 overseers CG 47001-47015

Isetemkhebit (I) – Ast-m-Ax-bit (I)
A.126 (attribution by Daressy)
Worker 24/10/2012 Charles Bouche auction lot 81 11.8 cm, overseer (modified worker) unknown French auction
Normally overseers of Isetemkhebit wear a triangular long apron ending under the knees, but there are also overseers with the apron ending above the knees. A number of overseers like the one above is made of a worker. Here are a few examples, the two on the left are converted workers and the one on the right (Cairo Museum) was actually created as an overseer and is as described by Newberry
Photo: worker Thierry de Maigret 2012, overseer unknown

Isetemkhebit (II) – Ast-m-Ax-bit (II)
A.100
(attribution by author)
Worker 9.5 cm, see shabticollections.com SC/45, overseer 9.5 cm see shabticollections.com SC/143
Overseers with a small apron or bag are rare (the overseers in Cairo wear a big apron)
Dutch private collection 2020
Photo: VB

Shabti box of Isetemkhebit noted by Bouriant B.19. The whereabouts are unknown

Khaas – xAas
Daressy A.102
Also known as Chaas
Ranke I, pg. 262, 14

Chantress of Amen

Coffins JE 29665 in Cairo Inv.no. OC: CG-6115-6116, IC: CG-6077-6075, MB: CG-6075

Funerary papyri (BA, no inv.no.) in Cairo.

According to Daressy, an unlocated Amduat papyrus has been found on her mummy. Liliane Aubert wonders if this might not be one of the anonymous people (Sadek 1985, C1, C13 or C27)?

Newberry registered 4 workers and 5 overseers CG 48225-48233

Khaas – xAas
Worker Cairo CG 48226 8.5 cm, overseer Cairo 7933 CG 482(27-31) 8.5 cm
Photo: VB 2015

Khonsuemheb – xnsw-m-Hb
2 types
Daressy A.106
Also known as Khonsemheb, Khonsouemheb, Chonsemheb
Ranke I, pg. 271, 3
The name means ‘Khonsu is in celebration’

God’s father of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, God’s father of Khonsu, God’s servant of Khonsu-Ra, Scribe of the counting of the grain in the domain of Amen

Liliane Aubert writes that Khonsouemheb added his titles “Scribe of the counting of the grain in the domain of Amen” (also on his shabti box) and “Wab-priest at the prow of Mut” on the sarcophagus which he usurped from Nespaneferher. See pg. 86

Coffins in Cairo Inv.no. CG-6002-6004

Funerary papyri
BD S.R.VII.10228, Cairo 65

Book of the Dead for Khonsuemheb
Length 259 cm, height 23 cm
Panorama view, VB 2021

Amduat papyrus for Khonsuemheb
Length 149 cm, height 40 cm
See for description Sadek 1985, C30 Planche 43, for description see page 213-217
Panorama view, VB 2021

Two shabti boxes according Aston, but only one reference (type Vb) in Vienna KHM 6259
The coffin can be dated to the period c. 1010-950 BC (Aston)

Newberry registered 6 workers of type 1 and 4 workers of type 2, CG 48120-48124 with a green body (right arm over left) and CG 48125 (also right arm over left) plus CG 48126-48129 with a white body (left arm over right).

The shabti in the photo of type 2 is clearly light blue and on the Newberry specimens the blue may have disappeared or not added so maybe Newberry only saw a white undercoating. It may also be the case that type 1 and 2 are all made blue, but that the blue on type 1 has changed to green. A discoloration that often occurs with light blue shabtis and is often clearly visible on shabtis of faience. On terracotta shabtis you have to look carefully, but traces of the original light blue can also be found in various places on EA24817 and EA24818 in the British Museum

Khonsuemheb – xnsw-m-Hb
Type 1
Worker arms right over left British Museum EA24817 9.1 cm
Photo: © The Trustees of the British Museum

Khonsuemheb – xnsw-m-Hb
Type 2
Worker arms left over right (blue or blue/green) Field Museum of Natural History inv. 31182, approx. 10 cm
Photo: VB 2007

Shabti box of Khonsuemheb type Vb
Vienna KHM 6259
Photo: Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien

Khonsuemheb in front of Osiris and Isis
BD S.R.VII.10228, Cairo 65
Photo: VB 2021

Khonsuenrenep – xnsw-n-rnp
Daressy A.120
Also Khonsemrenep, Khonsuemrenep, Khonsouemrenep
Ranke I, pg. 271, 2
The name means ‘Khonsu becomes young’

Wab-priest of Amen, Scribe of the domain of Khonsu

Liliane Aubert mentions other intriguing functions of this important priest. “The inscriptions adorning his sarcophagus (Niwinski pg. 118) teaches us that he was “Scribe of organization and Grand controller of the domain of the royal son of Kush”, that is to say the countries of the South. “Scribe of the domain of Khnum, lord of the Cataract at Eléphantine”, so he supervised the border of the first Nome of Upper Egypt, furthermore “Scribe of the domain of Osiris, Lord of Abydos” north of Thebes, and “Scribe of the domain of Onuris-Chou, son of Ra” in the region of This north of Abydos”. See Aubert, pg. 85

Coffins JE 29613 in Cairo Inv.no. OC: CG-6256-6257, IC: CG-6258-6259, MB: CG-6220

Funerary papyri
BD 31759, Chicago 2, Field Museum
BA S.R.VII.11501, Cairo 123

Khonsuenrenep, Mythological Papyri 1957, © Piankoff and Rambova detail Plate 11,  for description see page 117-125

One shabti box in Cairo JE 29295
Pontificate Pinedjem II c. 1001-976 BC

Newberry registered 10 workers and 12 overseers CG 48042-48063. Newberry states explicitly that he has found 5 light blue, 6 dark blue and 11 pale blue varnished shabtis.

If we look at the shabtis, they are amber or yellow. Varnish can discolour considerably and maybe Newberry thought that blue was the original colour because it can be seen in various places on different shabtis. So, a white undercoat, a blue layer to give the shabtis a blue appearance and a layer of varnish that has been heavily discoloured over the centuries. It remains a difficult issue. Here a compilation of several pieces on which the blue can be seen. Courtesy Niek de Haan

Khonsuenrenep – xnsw-n-rnp
Worker Cairo 7944 11.5 cm – CG 48042-48046, overseer Cairo 7945 – CG 48053 11 cm (see label on the right leg)
Photo: VB 2015 (in showcase)

Shabti box of Khonsuenrenep type ? in Cairo JE 29295

Khonsuenrenep, wearing the festal cone and a lotus bud, stands in an attitude of prayer. He is led forward toward Osiris by the ibis-headed Thoth who holds the sign of life. The god is seated on a throne on which is represented the Union of the Two Lands. He wears the Atef-crown with the horns and disk, the short cloak of the Sed-festival, and carries the crook and the flagellum. Before him is an altar on which are lotus flowers, grapes, a pomegranate, figs, meat, a basket, and four loaves of bread. Under the altar stands a jar of beer and a lettuce Mythological Papyri 1957, © Piankoff and Rambova detail Plate 11, text pg. 117

Khonsumes – xnsw-ms
Daressy A.82 or A.121 (or A.22)
Also known as Khonsoumes, Khonsmes, Khonsmose, Chonsmes
Ranke I, pg. 271, 7
The name means ‘Khonsu is born’

In the tomb Daressy has found 3 coffin sets that can be attributed to a Khonsumes. All three have the title of Scribe of the domain of Amen. Daressy has attributed the shabtis to A.22. But that is unlikely because this coffin set is usurped by a Mistress of the House whose name has been lost. On the shabti box the title of Scribe of the domain of Amen has been dedicated to Amen-Re, the king of the gods. This extended title also occurs on A.22 and A.82, but not on A.121. So, could we link the shabti box to A.82 on this basis?

There is no funerary papyri known and there is no registration of the shabtis in Newberry

Although the shabtis appear amber and yellow in colour, it could very well be that the original color is blue just like Khonsuenrenep

In Schneider II, p. 148, Prof. Schneider writes at 4.5.1.27 “painted green with yellow varnish, details black”. Because green on shabtis is often a discoloration of blue and varnish also tends to discolour, this could also be an indication that the shabtis were originally blue. Other examples of blue to green discoloration can be found at the bottom of the details of Khonsuemheb

Khonsumes – xnsw-ms
A.22

Scribe of the domain of Amen-Re, the king of the gods
Coffin set A.22 ex- IC: JE 29676 + JE 29731 (lid) in Florence Inv.no. IC: 8527 (case/lid) modified for a woman, MB: 9530 (also for a lady), so this set of Khonsumes was usurped for a unknown lady
Research and photos of the coffin ensemble in The tomb of the priests of Amun pg. 152-194 and 486-487
The to A.22 attributed shabti box can be dated stylistically to the period of c. 1030-980 BC (Aston)

Khonsumes – xnsw-ms
A.82

Wab-priest of Amen-Re, the king of the gods and Scribe of the domain of Amen
Coffin set A.82 in Alexandria, Musée Grēco-Romain Inv.no. 386, 1297 and 1641 (Niwinski) or/and in Uppsala VM 228 ex-JE 29709 and the mummy board in Stockholm NME 894 (Aston)
The burial can be dated to the period c. 1001-992 BC (Aston)
The set in Uppsala and Stockholm is in Niwinski attributed to A.121

Khonsumes – xnsw-ms
A.121
(Niwinski)
Wab-priest of Amen, Wab-priest of Mut and Scribe of the domain of Amen
Coffin set ex JE 29709 in Uppsala Victoria Museet VM 228 and mummy board in Stockholm Medelhavsmuseet NME 894
Aston list a unknown coffin as Anonymous and dates the burial to the period c. 1001-976 BC, pg. 186

Khonsumes – xnsw-ms
A.82
(Daressy attributed the shabtis to A.22, but A.82 might be a better choice)
Worker approx 9 cm Museum Gustavianum, Uppsala
Photo: Niek de Haan 2009

Shabti box of Khonsumes A.22? type Vb
Attribution to A.82 by author
Berlin BM 11988
Photo: The shabti box a typological study, Aston, 1994

Makaekra – m-kAk-ra
Daressy (-), A.132?
Also known as Maatkara, Maatkare, Makaekra, Makaekre, Kaekre, Emkaekre
Not found in Ranke

Mistress of the house and Chantress of Amen

If these shabtis belong to A.132, then this is the daughter of Pinedjem II and Isetemakhbit D

Coffins JE 29612 usurped from Ankhesenaset in Cairo OC: CG-6286-6287, IC: CG-6288-6289, MB: CG-6283

Funerary papyri
BD S.R.IV.959, Cairo 38

BA S.R.IV.548
= JE 95650 = 14/7/35/8, Cairo 13

Amduat papyrus for Makaekra
Name on this papyrus Maatka(ek)ra?
Length 133 cm, height 24 cm
See Sadek 1985, C10 Planche 18, for description see page 125-129
Panorama view, VB 2021

Liliane Aubert writes that it is tempting to attribute this group to the daughter of Pinedjem II and Isetemkhebit D (see Aubert pg. 69), Maatkara A.132, but no evidence has been found. Interesting theory because the shabtis of Maatkara in the correct writing are unknown and one would expect them to be there as many other funeral gifts have been found. See Aston pg. 188. It is therefore not unreasonable to link the name that resembles that of Maatkara (mAa.t-kA-ra) to Emkaekra (m-kA-k-ra, pronounced Makaekra?), especially since no other coffin or mummy has been found to make the link with the Makaekra shabtis
Aston dates the burial of Maatkara to c. 976-944 BC

However, Daressy has the name displayed on his shabti registration with hieroglyphs for the Sun and Goddess Maat and neither can be found on the shabtis we have here. Moreover, according to his description, the Maatkara’s are white-painted terracotta shabtis and those of Makaekra are made of faience. And, with the correct hieroglyphs, the Makaekra’s are also included in Daressy’s list. So this is still a big mystery to be solved

Newberry registered 10 workers and 10 overseers CG 46739-46758 and did not find any shabtis with the hieroglyphs with the Sun, Goddess Maat and Ka-sign as listed by Daressy

m-kA-k-ra

mAa.t-kA-ra

Makaekra – m-kAk-ra
Worker 10.1 cm, overseer 10.3 cm, both in Dutch private collection
Photo: VB

Makaekra in front of Osiris. Sadek 1985, pg. 128 fig. 22
Name noted by Sadek is mAat-kA-ra

Mehunedjem – mHw-nDm
2 types
Daressy (-)
Also known as Mehounedjem, Mehtaunedjem
Ranke I, pg. 163, 30
The name means ‘The pleasant North-wind’

During the evacuation of the Bab el Gasus cache, Bouriant registered Mehunedjem on his shabtis list. We only know of this person’s existence from the shabtis that were found

Mehunedjem is one of the persons from the B&G cache, who cannot be matched with any of the “anonymous” coffins or mummies. So, coffins, funerary papyri and shabti boxes are not attributed. See Aston Mehtaunedjem pg. 195

Newberry registered 10 workers and 10 overseers (46873) -46874-46892. The length of the overseers varies between 9.7 cm (5x) and 11.5 cm (5x)

It seems that of type 1, as with Tashedkhonsu, three sizes are available, for Newberry describes overseers of 9.7 cm and 11.5 cm. So probably there are also workers of this size. The pictured version of Type 1 and 2 show great similarities with the series of Tashedkhonsu and Userhatmes

It is not possible to determine whether the 10 workers CG 46634-46643 also belong to the Bab el Gasus cache. It seems unlikely because of their 15 cm height, which would make them one of the the largest in the cache

Mehunedjem – mHw-nDm
Type 1
Worker Dutch private collection 10.3 cm plus possible overseer 9.7 cm
Photo: Niek de Haan 2021
Workers of this series also exist with a hair band adorned on an unpainted wig, see here with Newberry Pl. XXXVI CG 46877, 10.5 cm

Mehunedjem – mHw-nDm
Type 2
Worker estimated 12 cm, MAEC, Museo dell’Accademia Etrusca e della Città di Cortona. Possible overseer 11.5 cm, it may also be the case that this one belongs to the first type
Photo: Niek de Haan 2010

Menkheperra B – mn-xpr-ra
Daressy A.147
Also known as Menkheperre
Ranke I, pg. 150, 14
The name means ‘The future of Re is stable’

Third prophet of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, Greatest of Re-Atem’s seers in Thebes, Setem priest in the Horizon of Eternity, God’s father and Third prophet of Khonsu in Thebes Neferhotep, Chief of the cattle in the house of Re in the domain of Amen

Son of Tjanefer A and Gautseshen A and grandson of HPA Menkheperra A. Brother of Nesyamun and Pinedjem A (A.146, not in this overview), see Bab El-Gasus in Context: Rediscovering the Tomb of the priests of Amun, pg. 172-173

Coffins  JE 29735 Inv.no. OC: 6269|6272 and JE 29628 in Cairo Inv.no. IC: CG-6268|6271, MB: CG-6270

Funerary papyri
BD S.R.IV.967 = CG 40010 = JE 95866, Cairo 41

BA S.R.IV.529 + S.R.IV.1004 = JE 95638, Cairo 5

Amduat papyrus for Menkheperra B
Length 152 cm, height 25,5 cm (3 fragments), total length unknown
Panorama view, VB 2021

Menkheperra’s burial took place in Year 10 of Siamon c. 976 BC (Aston pg. 195)

Newberry registered 5 workers and 5 overseers CG 46819-46828

Menkheperra B – mn-xpr-ra B
Worker approx. 12.5 cm, MAEC, Museo dell’Accademia Etrusca e della Città di Cortona, overseer Newberry CG 46826 13 cm
Photo: worker Niek de Haan 2010, overseer VB 2015

Worker and overseer in Newberry CG 46820, CG 46826, plate XXXVI and XXXVII

Meretamen / Amenmeret – imn-mrt
3 types
Daressy A.71
Also known as Meretamon, Meretamun, Meretimen, Imenmeret, Amenmeret
Ranke I, pg. 158, 15, Ranke II, pg. 362
The name means ‘The beloved of Amen’

Mistress of the House, Chantress of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, Musician of the choir of Mut, great lady of Isheru, Nurse of Khonsu the child

Daughter of HPA Menkheperra A and Isememkhebit C and (half-)sister of Pinedjem II, Ankhefenmut, Gautseshen A, Hori and Tjanefer

Coffins JE 29734 Inv.no. OC: CG unknown, JE 29704 Inv.no. IC: CG-6176-6175, MB: CG-6197

Funerary papyrus
BA S.R.IV.933 = JE 95836, Cairo 31

Meretamen, BA Contribution à l’étude de l’Amdouat, © Sadek 1985, C16 Planche 26-27, for description see page 145-150

Not linked to a coffin is this papyrus, which may also belong to this lady. It should be noted, however, that her important titles are missing
BA S.R.IV.10227, Cairo 64

Amduat papyrus for (a?) Meretamen
Length 243 cm, height 23 cm
See Sadek 1985, C14 Planche 23-24, for description see page 138-142
Panorama view, VB 2021

Meretamen’s name can also be written as Amenmeret as on the first and second types. Both names are used in the literature, but in this case, they are for the same person. The God’s name Amen is put forward as is often the case with the name of gods (honorific transposition)
Meretamen’s burial is dated to c. 990-970 BC (Aston)

Newberry registered
Type 1: 20 workers and 10 overseers
Type 2:   5 workers and   5 overseers
Type 3:   5 workers and   5 overseers
Amenmeret CG 46773-46778, CG 46849-46872, 47111-47120, Meretamen CG 46923-46932

Type 1 & 2

Type 3

Meretamen / Amenmeret – imn-mrt
Type 1
Worker 12.7 cm, see The tomb of the priests of Amun, pg. 377-379, overseer Musée de Picardie – Amiens approx. 13 cm
Photo: worker at La Reine Margot Paris, overseer VB 2012

Meretamen / Amenmeret – mrt-imn
Type 3
Worker British Museum EA24847 11 cm
Overseer in the Kestner Museum Hannover. I could not find a photo of this overseer, fortunately Miguel recognized one in the Kestner Museum. Because it is impossible to take a complete picture, the photo shown above is a composition of two photos. So, the real proportions are slightly distorted and the upper body is slightly rotated compared to the lower body. Here the original photos as taken by Niek de Haan
Photo: worker © The Trustees of the British Museum, overseer Niek de Haan 2009

Meretamen / Amenmeret – imn-mrt
Type 2

Worker approx. 10 cm Museum Gustavianum, Uppsala, overseer Field Museum of Natural History inv. 31040, Chicago approx. 10 cm
Photo: worker Niek de Haan 2006, overseer VB 2007

Meretamen in front of an offering table. At the top of the scene is written: “The Osiris, the lady, chantress of Amon-Re, the king of the gods, chantress of Mut the great, the lady of Isheru, nurse of Khonsu the child, Meritamon, justified, daughter of Menkheperre justified. She says: ‘Homage to you, Lords of the mysteries of the Douat, the great Ennead of those who are at the entrances of the Necropolis, may you grant me to go out and then enter beyond them, for I am one of you” 
Sadek 1985, pg. 147 fig. 27

Nekhbu – nxbw
Daressy (-)
Also known as Nekhbou, Nakhbu, Nekhbou
Ranke I, pg. 209, 14

Newberry registered 1 overseer CG 46816 and made the remark ‘Not in Daressy’. And indeed, neither Bouriant nor Daressy have noted this name or anything resembling it. Yet Newberry probably thought this shabti came from the Bab el Gasus cache. For the sake of completeness, I have included the series in this overview

Nekhbu – nxbw
no picture

Nespaherentahat – ns-pA-Hr-n-tA-HAt
Daressy A.28
Also known as Nespaherenhat, Nespahorentahet
Ranke I, pg. 175, 12

Fourth prophet of Amen

Coffins JE 29643 (usurped from a Padiamun) in Cairo Inv.no. OC: CG-6154-6155, IC: CG-6119-6120, MB: CG-6144

One shabti box (type Vb) JE 29293 in Cairo (dated to 1000-980 BC (Aston pg. 168))

See Estatuetas funerárias Egípcias da XXI dinastia, pg. 512 (170), The heart scarab of Nespaherentahat in Göttinger Miszellen 249, Brian Weightman and The Third Intermediate Period in Egypt, K.A. Kitchen pg. 307-308 § 266

See also Petrie Museum UC39912 and UC39913 for the name written with Gardener Q3 (stool/square) instead of G40 (flying duck). Maybe different series or owner

Nespaherentahat – ns-pA-Hr-n-tA-HAt
Worker Petrie UC39914 approx. 10 cm
Photo: Petrie Museum

Shabti box Nespaherentahat type Vb JE 29293 in Cairo (dated to 1000-980 BC (Aston pg. 168))

Nespakashuty – ns-pA-qA-Swty
2 types
Daressy A.43
Also known as Nespakachouty, Nesipakashuti, Nesipakashuty
Ranke I, pg. 175, 18
The name means ‘The one who belongs to the God’

God’s father of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, Overseer of the treasury of the domain of the Divine Adoratrice of Amen

Coffins JE 29641 in Cairo Inv.no. OC: CG-6018|6062/(CG-6014a-6014b), IC: CG-6061|6086/(CG-6015), MB: CG-6087

Funerary papyri
BD S.R.IV.994 = JE 95889, Cairo 48

BA S.R.VII.10272, Cairo 101

Amduat papyrus for Nesypakashuty
Length 112 cm, height 25 cm
See Contribution à l’étude de l’Amdouat, Sadek 1985, C11 Planche 18-19, for description see page 130-133
Panorama view, VB 2021

One shabti box (type VIb) F.93/10.5 in RMO Leiden and the second one (unconfirmed) in Germany
Pontificate of Psusennes III c. 976-944 BC

Newberry registered 1 overseer CG 47783 with an inscription down the front of his skirt

Nespakashuty – ns-pA-qA-Swty
Type 1
Worker and overseer in Museum Gustavianum, Uppsala approx. 12 cm. The worker and overseer are rather slender modelled compared to the worker of type 2, also the elbows are more pressed against the body, see here some other slender examples (current location unknown to me, probably Copenhagen Inv.no. 4004-4006)
In Florence (8591) an overseer of this series has a column of hieroglyphs with the title and part of the name. See The tomb of the priests of Amun, pg. 399-401
Photo: Niek de Haan 2009

Nespakashuty – ns-pA-qA-Swty
Type 2
Worker, 13 cm, no. 51 in Shabtis a private view, Janes 2002. A shabti friend mailed me that he once saw one measuring 14.5 cm. So if you know any, let me know
Photo: GJ

Shabti box of Nespakashuty type VIb
RMO Leiden F93/10.5
Photo: VB (HC 2013)

Second Shabti box of Nespakashuty type ? in Germany
Graefe, 1981 (unconfirmed)
Research Miguel Ángel Escobar Clarós

Nespakashuty is offering a vase of ointment to Osiris. On the left, the god is standing on a pedestal. Sadek 1985, pg. 133 fig. 23

Nespaneferher – ns-pA-nfr-Hr
Daressy A.117 – attributed to A.98 (A.21, A.106)
Also known as Nespaneferhor, Nespahernefer, Nespaneferhor
Ranke I, pg. 175, 5
The name means ‘The one who belongs to the beautiful faces’

Prophet and God’s father of Amen, God’s father of Mut, Scribe and overseer of the recruits of the domain of Amen

Based on research of the objects it is suggested that the series belong to the owner of A.98 and not to A.117 as attributed by Bouriant/Daressy

Liliane Aubert writes “Nespaneferher was attributed several sarcophagi: the one usurped by Khonsouemheb A.106, the one reused by Horhotep A.117, that of the enigmatic A.21 which actually belongs to a homonym, and finally the one used by our character, A.98″

One shabti box (type Vb) in Toulouse Labit 49.309
Based on Aston’s notes on A.98 the burial probably dates to the period 1001-992 BC (Aston pg. 181)

Newberry registered 14 workers and 5 overseers CG 47031-47049. He describes 12 workers of about 12 cm, 1 of 10.5 cm and 1 of 9.5 cm. There are 4 overseers of 12 cm with the left arm down like in the picture, but Newberry also describes 1 overseer of 10 cm with a shawl and the right arm down instead of the left one. I wonder if this one is part of the series. The shabtis are now attributed to A.98

The letter containing the inventory of Bab el-Gasus gifts to France by Emile Brugsch (© Archives Nationales de France AN-F/17/17240) contains a handwritten note from someone else that 2 boxes should go to Toulouse and one box (Userhatmes) to Clermont-Ferrand, so maybe a second box is still in Toulouse or in the Louvre

© Archives Nationales de France AN-F/17/17240

Nespaneferher – ns-pA-nfr-Hr
A.21
God’s father (..?) of the domain of Amen
(see Niwinski pg. 180)
Location coffin unknown
No shabtis attributed

Nespaneferher – ns-pA-nfr-Hr
A.98
God’s father of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, God’s father of Mut, Overseer of the recruits of the domain of Amen

Son of a Serdjehuty who was also God’s father of Amen and Overseer of the recruits of the domain of Amen

Coffin location unknown
Mummy-linen of HPA Menkheperra A and Pinedjem II dates the burial to c. 1001-990 BC

Funerary papyri
MP S.R.IV.941 = JE 95843 = CG 58003, Cairo D
BD S.R.VII.11503, Cairo 125

Nespaneferher, fragment BD © Niwinski Studies on the illustrated Theban Funerary Papyri 1989 plate 25c

Amduat papyrus for Nesypaneferher
Length 244 cm, height 23 cm
See Contribution à l’étude de l’Amdouat, Sadek 1985, C8 Planche 15-16, for description see page 114-119
Panorama view, VB 2021

Newberry registered 14 workers and 5 overseers CG 47031-47049

Nespaneferher – ns-pA-nfr-Hr
A.106
Coffin CG-6002-6004 (usurped by Khonsouemheb), see P&M pg. 630, Niwinski pg. 132 no. 150

Nespaneferher – ns-pA-nfr-Hr
A.117
God’s father of Amen, God’s father of Mut, Overseer of the recruits of the domain of Amen
Coffins JE 29664 (usurped by Herethetep, God’s father of Amen and Scribe) in Cairo Inv.no. OC: CG-6166-6167, IC: CG-6168-6169, MB: CG-6170

Shabtis attributed by Bouriant but rejected by other scholars who linked them to A.98

Nespaneferher – ns-pA-nfr-Hr
A.98
(attribution by other scholars, originally A.117 by Bouriant/Daressy)
Worker approx. 11.5 cm, overseer approx. 11 cm Bonhams 28042010 Lot 333 .jpg
Photo: worker website Helios, overseer Bonhams 2010

Shabti box of Nespaneferher type Vb
Toulouse Musee Georges Labit 49.309
Photo: unknown

Nespaneferher A.98, burning incense, in front of Osiris. Sadek 1985, pg. 118 fig. 18

Nessuan – ns-sw-an
Daressy (-)
Also known as Nessouan
Not found in Ranke

Newberry registered 1 worker CG 48090 and made the remark ‘Not in Daressy’. And indeed, neither Bouriant nor Daressy have noted this name or anything resembling it. Yet Newberry probably thought this shabti came from the Bab el Gasus cache. For the sake of completeness, I have included the series in this overview

Nessuan – ns-sw-an
no picture

Nestanebettawy – ns-tA-nbt-tAwy
Daressy A.77 (A.6, A.9, A.64, A.88)
Also known as Nestanebtawy, Nesitanebtaui, Nestanebettaouy
Ranke I, pg. 179, 16
The name means ‘She who belongs to the Lady of the Two Lands’

The name Nestanebettawy occurs at least five times in the Bab el Gasus find. The tricky part is that the ladies were all singers for Amen. Daressy has linked the shabtis to the coffin set A.77 and to date this is a widely held opinion

Newberry has registered 20 workers and 10 overseers under CG 46893-46922 linked to A.77

 

Nestanebettawy – ns-tA-nbt-tAwy
A.6
Chantress of Amen-Re, the king of the gods
Coffins JE 29724 in Cairo (Niwinski) Inv.no. OC: unknown, IC: CG-6247-6248, MB: CG-6237
Aston, pg. 165 links the Leiden coffins F93/10.2 to A.6, see A.77
No shabtis attributed

Nestanebettawy – ns-tA-nbt-tAwy
A.9
Mistress of the house, Chantress of Amen-Re, the king of the gods
Coffins ex JE 29700 in Washington Inv.no. IC: A154955-0 (register entry), MB: 364998, funerary papyrus
BA S.R.VII.11493, Cairo 115
The coffin can be dated to c. 1000-930 BC (Aston)
No shabtis attributed

Nestanebettawy – ns-tA-nbt-tAwy
A.64
Chantress of Amen-Re, the king of the gods
Coffins JE 29656 (usurped by Henuttawy E) in Cairo
No shabtis attributed


Nestanebettawy
– ns-tA-nbt-tAwy
A.77

Mistress of the house, Chantress of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, Chantress in the room? of Mut
Coffins JE 29685 in Cairo (Niwinski)  Inv.no. OC: CG-6055-6056, IC: CG-6058-6059, MB: CG-6060 now in Leiden F93/10.2a (OC: outer, usurped by a unknown man), F93/10.2b (IC: inner), F93/10.2c (MB: mummy board)
Aston, pg. 176 links JE 29680 (= A.85 in Niwinski for Pasebakhaniut) OC: CG-6043-(6044), IC: CG-6041-6042, MB: CG-(6045) to A.77
Aston, pg. 165 links the Leiden coffins F93/10.2 to A.6

It is not clear to me which coffins are involved or to which they belong. The Nestanebettawy coffins in Leiden appear to have been converted to contain a man. The outer and inner box may also not belong together. Nevertheless, the set in Leiden has been attributed to Nestanebettawy

Funerary papyri
BD S.R.VII.11504, Cairo 126

Book of the Dead for Nestanebettawy
Length 113 cm, height 20 cm
Panorama view, VB 2021

One shabti box (type Vb) in London BM EA24894 and one shabti box (type Vb) in Madrid Inv.no. 18259

Newberry has registered 20 workers and 10 overseers under CG 46893-46922 

Nestanebettawy – ns-tA-nbt-tAwy
A.88
Mistress of the house, Chantress of Amen-Re, the king of the gods
Coffins JE 29716 in Cairo Inv.no. OC: CG-6245-6246, JE 29724 IC: CG-6247-6248, MB: CG-6237
Funerary papyrus
BA S.R.VII.10651 = JE 36259, Cairo 104
The burial can be dated to c. 976-944 BC (Aston)
No shabtis attributed

Nestanebettawy – ns-tA-nbt-tAwy
A.77
(attribution by Daressy)
Worker unknown approx 9.5 cm, overseer Musée des Beaux-Arts de Lyon, approx. 10 cm,
Photo: worker Niek de Haan, overseer VB 2020

Another worker CG 46905 and overseer CG 46917 in Newberry Plate XXXVIII and XXXVI

Shabti box of Nestanebettawy type Vb
London BM EA24894, Inv.no. 1893,1014.94
Height 44.5 cm, width 55 cm, depth 29.5 cm
Photo: © The Trustees of the British Museum

Second shabti box of Nestanebettawy type Vb
Museo Arqueologico Nacional, Madrid Inv.no. 18259
Height 44.5 cm, width 52.5 cm, depth 27.5 cm
Photo: The Global Egyptian Museum


Nestaudjat(akhet)
– ns-tA-wDAt-(Axt)
Daressy A.96
Also known as Nestaoudjatakhet, Nestawedjatakhet, Nesitaudjatakhet, Nesytaoudjatakhet
Ranke I, pg. 179, 12. Ranke II, pg 365
The name means ‘She who belongs to the glorious eye’

Mistress of the house, Chantress of Amen-Re, the king of the gods, Musician of the choir of Mut, the great lady of Isheru

Coffins JE 29712 in Odessa Inv.no. 52976 plus the inner coffin in the National Museum of Tatarstan (ex-Kazan University) IC: Inv.no. HMPT KII-5404/1, see Bab El-Gasus in Context: Rediscovering the Tomb of the priests of Amun 2021, pg. 293-312 by Vladimir Bolshakov

Funerary papyri
BA S.R.IV.558 = JE 95660, Cairo 21

Amduat papyrus for Nesytaudjatakhet
Length 133 cm, height 24 cm
Panorama view, VB 2021

BA S.R.VII.11497, Cairo 119

Amduat papyrus for Nesytaudjatakhet
Length 140 cm, height 22 cm
Panorama view, VB 2021

One shabti box (related to type Vb (Aston)) HM C 730.86 in St. Gallen, Switzerland
Pontificate HPA Menkheperra A c. 1051-1001 BC

Newberry registered 10 workers and 5 overseers CG 46962-46975 and CG 48305

In the Tomb of the Priests of Amun a little 6 cm overseer is attributed to this owner. There are two numbers on the back 8620 and 8595. These registration numbers correspond to the group coming from Cairo, but it is not often that an overseer is a lot smaller than the worker, see pg. 410. Since Newberry has registered overseers apparently of the same quality and size (10.5 – 12 cm) as the worker shown, I am not convinced that the 6 cm overseer belongs to this lady unless we find workers of the same size attributable to the BeG cache. Here the 6 cm overseer in Florence Inv.no. 8620 compared to the worker. Photo overseer on internet © The Tomb of the Priests of Amun

Araújo (pg. 762) lists another 11 cm overseer as (Nesi)taudjat, see Taudjatra. This one also does not fit Newberry’s descriptions, so I am still looking for a Newberry one

Nestaudjat(akhet)– ns-tA-wDAt-(Axt)
Worker Washington A154925-0 approx. 10.5 cm
Photo: Worker Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History

Shabti box of Nestaudjatakhet type Vb
St. Gallen GH C 730.86
Note: The name on the box is written as Nesy-ta-udjat-akhet
Photo: Schlögl, Brodbeck, Ägyptische Totenfiguren aus öffentlichen und privaten Sammlungen der
Schweiz pg.205

Nesyamen – nsy-imn
Daressy A.148
Also known as Nesyamun, Nesamen, Nesamun, Nesamon, Nesiamun
Ranke I, pg. 173, 19
The name means ‘The one who belongs to Amen’

God’s father of Amen, Chief of the secrets in the sky, on the earth and in the Duat, The one who opens the doors of the sky in Karnak, Fourth prophet of Amen
Note: Fourth (Third) prophet of Amen (see Aston pg. 193, Zarli pg. 386-388)

Son of Tjanefer A and Gautseshen A and grandson of HPA Menkheperra A, see Bab El-Gasus in Context: Rediscovering the Tomb of the priests of Amun, pg. 172-173 by France Jamen. Brother of Menkheperra B and Pinedjem A (A.146, no shabtis, not in this overview)

Coffins JE 29611 in Cairo Inv.no. OC: CG-6290-6291, IC: CG-6292-6293, MB: CG-6294

Funerary papyrus
BA S.R.IV.1535, Cairo 55

One shabti box (type VIb) Inv.no. 11989 in Berlin
Burial pontificate Psusennes III c. 976-944 BC

Newberry registered 10 workers (5 with 3 horizontal lines, 1 with 4 lines and 4 with 5 lines) and 10 overseers CG 46981-47000. All overseers wear a false beard, which in this period almost only occurs among persons of royal descent. So, although the relationship with HPA Menkheppera is not known, we might assume that Nesysamen is part of the family

Nesyamen – nsy-imn
Also known as Nesamen
Worker Musée De Picardie, Amiens, approx. 11.5 cm, overseer BM EA24834 11.5 cm
Photo: worker VB 2012, overseer © The Trustees of the British Museum

.

Shabti box of Nesyamen type VIb in Berlin Inv.no. 11989

Nesyamenipet – nsy-imn-ipt
Daressy A.113
Also known as Nesamenhotep, Nesamenope, Nesimenenipet, Nesamenopet, Nesiamenemope, Nesamunipet
Ranke I, pg. 173, 20
The name means ‘The one who belongs to Amen of Thebes’

Wab-priest at the prow of Amen, Great wab-priest having access to Amen in Karnak, Wab-priest of Amen, Acolyt? in the temple of Amen, Scribe of the treasury of the domain of Amen

Coffins JE 29659 (usurped from Imiseba) in Cairo Inv.no. OC: CG-6215-6216, IC: CG-6217|6180, MB: CG-6181

Funerary papyri
BD S.R.VII.10269, Cairo 98

Nesyamenipet, fragment BD © Niwinski Studies on the illustrated Theban Funerary Papyri 1989 plate 6b. The name on this payrus is written as Nesyamen

Amduat papyrus (for Nesyamenipet?)
Length 163 cm, height 25 cm
Suggested to belong to this owner by Niwinski
See Contribution à l’étude de l’Amdouat, Sadek 1985, C13 Planche 22, for description see page 136-137
Panorama view, VB 2021

Two shabti boxes (type VIa) JE 29283 and Ex. no. 9099
The burial is dated between 1001-992 BC (Aston)

Newberry registered 10 workers CG 48004-48013

Nesyamenipet – nsy-imn-ipt
Worker 8 cm
Photo: BB Antiken 2009

Shabti box of Nesyamenipet type VIa Inv.no. JE 29283. A description of both boxes can be found in Aston’s shabti box publication pg. 30

Second shabti box of Nesyamenipet type VIa Cairo exhibition number 9099. A description of the boxes can be found in Aston’s shabti box publication pg. 30

Nesykhonsu – nsy-xnsw
Daressy A.42
Also known as Neskhons, Nesikhons, Nesikhonsu, Nesikhonsou, Neschons
Ranke I, pg. 178, 20
The name means ‘The one who belongs to Khonsu’

Mistress of the house, Chantress of Amen

Coffins JE 29632 in Cairo CG-6024-6025 and JE 29713 in Istanbul ex Cairo IC: CG-6031|6040 (CG-6024a-6024b?), MB: CG-6030 (CG-6025?), Inv.no. 10875 (Niwinski)

Funerary papyri
BA S.R.VII.10252, Luxor 2, City Museum J.25, on loan from Cairo Museum

Nesykhonsu, Mythological Papyri 1957, © Piankoff and Rambova Plate 4, for description see page  80-81

Amduat papyrus for Nesykhonsu
Length 155 cm, height 23 cm
See Mythological Papyri 1957, Piankoff and Rambova Plate 5, for description see page  82-83
Panorama view, VB 2021

One shabti box 3913 (type VIb) in Copenhagen
Burial is dated c. 1001-992 BC (Aston)

Newberry registered 5 workers and 5 overseers CG 48014-48023. It is exceptional that the worker CG 48014 (Pl. XXXVIII Newberry III) does not carry a basket, pick and hoe, but a whip in the right hand. Was this meant to be as an overseer?
Newberry reports that only the overseer CG 48019 has an inscription, the other 4 would be without it. But at least that’s not correct for one of them, CG 48022, see the overseer in the picture. In his notes CG-48020-48023 he also refers to 48020 instead of 48019, so he probably had an off day

Nesykhonsu– nsy-xnsw
Worker Washington A154950-0 approx. 10.5 cm, overseer Cairo Museum 11 cm CG 48022
Photo: worker Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, overseer VB 2015

Shabti box of Nesykhonsu type VIb
Copenhagen National Museet Inv.no A154958-0 (3913 Aston)
Photo: VB 2010

Nesykhonsu, wearing the festal cone and a lotus flower on her head, lifts one arm in supplication before Osiris. In her other hand she holds the sign of life. Osiris, holding the crook with both hands, is seated on a throne on which is represented the Union of the Two Lands: the sign of union with the emblematic papyrus and lotus. The god wears the Atef-crown with two horns. Before him is a lettuce
Mythological Papyri 1957, © Piankoff and Rambova detail Plate 4, text pg. 80

Nesymut – nsy-mwt
Daressy A.48
Also known as Nesmut, Nesimut, Nesimout
Ranke I, pg. 176, 10, Ranke II, pg. 365
The name means ‘The one who belongs to Mut’

Chantress of Amen

Coffin JE 29634, CG-6007 (sic?) in Odessa IC: plus MB: Inv.no. 71700

Two shabti boxes listed by Bouriant B.69 and B.70, whereabouts unknown
Burial pontificate of Psusennes III c. 976-944 BC

Since the names of two Nes(y)mut’s have been found in the tomb, Marianne Zarli suggests that there are also can be two types of shabtis. She links a second type to A.54. A.54 is linked to coffin JE 29645, now in Nechâtel Inv.no. Eg. 184 (see Niwinski pg. 158), (A.54a (box-wall) in Avignon, Museé Calvet, Dautant/Jamen, see ‘Inventory of the yellow coffins in the French museums’) and is used for an anonymous man. In one spot of the outer coffin the name Nesmut is visible. I am not convinced that based on Zarli’s arguments there are two sets and I suspect that only for A. 48 shabtis have been found. So, I left it with one set for the lady attributed to A.48

No registration in Newberry

Nesymut – nsy-mwt
Worker Washington A154938-0 approx. 13.5 cm overseer 14.5 cm
For a female worker (with full writing of the name) see British Museum EA 24885
Photo: Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History

Shabti box of Nesymut noted by Bouriant in Daressy as B.69. The whereabouts are unknown

Second shabti box of Nesymut noted by Bouriant in Daressy as B.70. The whereabouts are unknown

Nesypaheran – nsy-pA-Hr-an
Daressy A.35
Also known as Nespaheran, Nesipaheran, Nespahoran
Ranke I, pg. 175, 10
The name means ‘The one who belongs to the God’

God’s father of Amen, Wab-priest of Khonsu, Scribe of the organization of the domain of Amen, God’s father of Maat

Coffins JE 29677 ex Inv.no. OC: CG-6223-6224 and JE 29722 in the Suez Museum ex Inv.no. IC: CG-6221-6222, MB: CG-6240

Funerary papyrus
BA Bodleian Library, Papyrus Skrine, Oxford 2

Newberry registered 6 workers (1 of 9 cm) and 3 overseers CG 46938-46946

Daressy attributed the shabtis to 46, must be 35

Nesypaheran – nsy-pA-Hr-an
Worker MNA E108 10.2 cm, overseer MNA E106 10.2 cm
Museu Nacional de Arqueologia, Lisboa,
Photo: VB 2009

In Cairo Newberry CG 46944 an overseer with the name of the owner written on the legs under the skirt

Niek de Haan pointed me to a type in a Dutch collection with a relatively large head, possibly it has something to do with the manufacturing process and that this is the same type as the others. Otherwise it is a rare anomaly

Detail of papyrus Skrine n. 2, Blackman, 1918 Pl. 4, 12

Diane Leeman, in Feline-faced Deities of the Underworld, writes the following about the special supernatural being:

A goddess, named as S’ryt, with two heads, one of a lioness and the other of a crocodile, the latter emerging from the back of the lioness head. According to the author, there is no other example of the goddess or of her name.
The text accompanying this goddess:
O S’ryt, that has come from the West, give thy arms to embrace the face of the Osiris, the priest, scribe, oblationer, god’s father of Ma’at, the daughter of Re, Nespeheran. Hide him in they arms. Drive away pain from him. There shall no evil come to pass upon his mummy any day

Nesypawtytawy – nsy-pAw-ty-tAwy
Daressy A.26
Also known as Nespaoutytaouy, Nespautytawy, Nesypautitawy, Nesypautawy, Nespautitaui, Nesipautiutaui
Ranke I, pg. 176, 1
His name means ‘The one who belongs to the God’

Singer of West-Thebes, Wab-priest of Mut, Wab-priest of Amen, Scribe of the temple of Amen

Coffins JE 29631 in Vienna Inv.no. KHM OC: 6263 (usurped from Ankhkhonsu), IC: 6262, MB: 6261

Funerary papyrus
BA S.R.VII.10238, Cairo 75

Amduat papyrus for Nesypawtytawy
Length 225 cm, height 12 cm
See Mythological Papyri 1957, Piankoff and Rambova Plate 3, for description see page  77-79
Panorama view, VB 2021

The burial can be dated to the pontificate of Pinedjem II c. 1001-976 BC

Glenn Janes made me aware of this shabti that may also be from the Bab el Gasus cache. The size, style and execution of the shabti fit well among the series found. However, I have not yet found any further clues other than the similarity of the name (A.26) and design. Also Liliane Aubert could not give an opinion about it, she writes about this shabti only the following words ‘Incertain: Nespaoutytaouy’ on pg. 107 where she describes the shabtis that are not included in her fantastic publication. For the sake of completeness, I have included the series in this overview

Niek de Haan has found indications that this series was on the market much earlier than the discovery of Bab el Gasus. In Vienna a shabti is kept that has been purchased in 1878, so 13 years before the excavation. Indeed, the piece came from the collection of Archduke Franz Carl and then passed into the Miranar collection (no. 45), see CAA Wien, Kunsthistorisches Museum ÄS 3984. Niek de Haan has created a 2019 list of known shabtis, see The shabtis of Nesi-Paouty-Taouy

So is it possible that this shabti belonged to the owner of the coffin in Bab el Gasus? It could be because the coffin of a Nesypawtytaw was reburied. So it was originally buried with grave goods elsewhere and it is almost certain that many shabti boxes and shabtis were not taken along to the secret reburial. Does the shabti perhaps come from the original grave of the owner? In any case, another mystery that may one day be solved

Another question that arises is the title on Type 2, not for a Wab priest, but for a God’s father. Could this be another person?

No registration in Newberry

Nesypawtytawy – nsy-pA-wty-tAwy
Type 1
Worker 13 cm, from Althorp House, family home of Princess Di (Spencer family), now in other private UK collection, overseer approx. 13 cm Glasgow, Hunterian Museum Inv.no. GLAHM D.37
Photo: worker GJ, overseer publication NH

Nesypawtytawy – nsy-pA-wty-tAwy
Type 2
With the title it-nTr n imn, God’s Father of Amen
Worker 12 cm, private collection DE
Photo: courtesy AB